Compassion – The Nature of Perception, Judgment and Self-Realization

While many people perceive compassion as an act or something you do, true compassion is the result of a state of mind that you embody as a way of perceiving others from a non-judgmental perspective. It’s the primary way we come to understand others by “understanding ourselves” in them. It’s an intuitive lens we look through that always seeks first to understand. We only truly love what we understand, and we only understand by being able to relate to that same idea in ourselves, which requires self-reflection. It’s bearing witness to someone else’s experience by looking at it through their eyes and as they are experiencing it, without the need or unconscious tendency to alter it through your judgment, and make it about you by correcting their perception, making it wrong or bad somehow (deeming your perspective more accurate and right), or reforming their experience by reliving it from your own perspective instead.

Whatever state-of-mind as an attitude that we walk through life with determines our approach and how we “see” things, as well as how we interpret what we see to give it meaning, which is what shapes our experience of it. If we have an attitude of judging, of finding what’s wrong or bad about someone or something, then we “see in them” only what warrants judgment. Through our very “perception” of something as a quality of consciousness or way of being, we “stimulate and activate” that same quality in them, bringing it out in them through the nature of our interaction as a joint expression. We can only perceive in others what’s “in us”, because it’s our model that we’re looking through in order to form our experience of them. We never really perceive others or the outer objective reality as they actually exist apart from us, but rather as we remake them through our “experience of them”, that makes them “like us”.

 Mental Paradigm as Our Lens of Perception

Our mental paradigm is constructed over many years through the incorporation of our values, beliefs, memories, preferences, temperament, etc., which together form a dynamic matrix that systematically produce our personal reality. Our personal reality is not the same as the objective reality we all share in common as a part of mass consciousness and the material world, but rather how we reformulate it through the lens of “meaning” that produces how we experience it as a personal creation. We reshape it through a process of resonance as natural selection that turns some aspects on (activates them making them stand out), while turning others off (recede and go unnoticed), where we only notice certain aspects, the ones that match our paradigm, while failing to recognize others altogether. By mentally enhancing, embellishing, or exaggerating selected aspects while downplaying others and leaving out others, we reform it to the same nature as we are as the testimony of our beliefs about it.

We assign everything the same qualities as we ourselves possess by how we interpret them to give the ideas and behaviors being expressed meaning. The meaning we give things forms the story we tell ourselves about them and how we form our experience of them as a result. Each person creates a unique experience of the same idea, event, and set of circumstances, by filtering it through their mental model, conforming and reshaping it accordingly. This is the most fundamental act of resonance, sympathetic induction, and coherence as the primary law of the mind and vibration. As we begin resonating with something, we energetically blend with and “enter into it”, becoming one with it in mind, and by how we act to influence it, we alter it by forming a new vibration that’s a combination of both as a form of offspring, where both ideas begin vibrating in harmony with each other.

The man made concept of right and wrong, and good and bad as our values forms the basis for our judgments and prejudices. In the natural world of instinct, all forces and powers simply exist as attributes and qualities that act to shape characteristics that form natural behaviors. The idea of right and wrong originated as an evaluation of what results as an expression of character that creates by producing phenomena of some sort. The fundamental appraisal of whether or not something is good or bad is usually based on whether it’s creative, constructive, and beneficial, or whether it’s chaotic, destructive, and harmful in some way. All qualities, regardless of their nature, are dual in nature and hold the potential of being good or bad based on the context in which they’re being used. All behavior is appropriate when employed under certain circumstances. Violence, when used in a destructive manner to violate, hurt, or kill for selfish reasons, would be judged (evaluated) as being bad or evil, whereas if that same act of violence was used to protect, defend, or carry out a necessary justice, it would considered good and divine in nature. Same act, different reason and context.

       Likewise, judgment itself is of a both good and correct nature, and a bad or incorrect nature, depending on how it’s being used. The mind is always using its ability to evaluate ideas and situations as the means of making decisions and acting that we call “using good judgment”. In these situations we employ an objective mindset that’s neutral and unbiased, where we openly perceive the nature of people and things involved, then make an evaluation based on what’s being demonstrated and observed, and make a decision accordingly. False judgment, the one most are referring to when they use the term “judgment”, comes as a form of prejudice that we employ beforehand and use as a lens that we look through that alters what we see to match our preconceived judgment of it. We walk into a situation with a preconceived idea or value that they themselves are not demonstrating outwardly, and we form an opinion of them based on the values we’re assigning to them, instead of the ones they actually possess, and use it as a means of interpreting their behaviors or experiences to mean what we want them to mean, rather than what they actually do mean.

Compassion is to relinquish judgment all together and seek instead to only relate and understand. It’s to embody a primary “state of love” as communion. We can only truly love what we first understand. Whatever lens we use to look through, we vibrate at that frequency, and connect to that same frequency in others, stimulating it in them, bringing it out as an active state that then forms the basis of the interaction. We serve to naturally “call forth in others” whatever is actively expressing in us, not only through the nature of our interaction, but just through our “perception of them” as an energetic interaction of stimulus-response, and action that produces a like reaction. Whatever we place our attention on (gaze at), we stimulate and reformulate by awakening certain aspects, while returning other aspects to a latent state. Our consciousness interacts with the “same” consciousness in everything else. We’re always remaking others in our own image and with our own likeness.

To be compassionate, or to more accurately embody a state of compassion, is to withhold all judgment and preconceived ideas and look upon others and the experiences their going through from “their” perspective, while relating to those same ideas in our own experiences, helping you to understand what they’re going through, or what process of realization they’re involved in. It’s to listen to them express how they’re experiencing something, what they’re contemplating, or how they’re stepping into and experimenting with an idea as a means of forming some kind of self-realization through it that will help make decisions based on it. All experience comes through experimentation of some kind that provides the basis for self-realization based on the decisions we make due to what we realize. As we experience something, we’re exploring, tapping into new aspects of ourselves stimulated and brought out through the experience, and learning about ourselves and growing as a result. We’re always learning about ourselves, others, and the way the world is through direct experience and making constant decisions about and for ourselves based on them. If we like how we feel, what we do, and who we become in a situation, we continue into it. And if we don’t, we stop it, avoid it in the future, and don’t act to repeat it. All experience is self-created and provides us with knowledge about ourselves that we use to create ourselves through choice and free will.

        As we enter into relationship with another, and bear witness to their experiences by listening to them as things were for them, while simultaneously tuning into and touching on our own experiences of a similar nature, we relate to them, and by relating to them we understand where they’re at in their learning process. We can understand what part of the process they’re in and maneuvering as a way of creating themselves by way of their own evaluation and interpretation. We can realize that same act in ourselves, and how we formed conclusions based on the same type of idea, while realizing and honoring the fact that they may form an entirely different conclusion, and simply being with them in that process, while gaining a whole new way of perceiving it. By sharing in another person’s experience while relinquishing the need to be right or more correct, and therefore modifying it, we fully engage in it as an imaginary journey that has something else entirely different to show us about new and unexplored possibilities.

Through the practice of witnessing, which is to act as a passive observer and neutral mirror for someone else’s experience by listening intently while imagining it from their perspective as it is or was for them, without changing it through our own values and beliefs (judgments), or commenting on it in any way, we not only help the other person to gain deeper realizations into the lessons of their own experiences, but we also gain the experience as a form of lesson or self-realization for ourselves by way of their experience. We’re offered the lesson without having to live it ourselves, but rather through the experience the “telling” provides, and how we merge into and relate to the experience. When we become one with another by sharing in their experiences, we acquire many more lessons that bring new and varied realizations that serve to naturally shape us through the acquisition.

Whenever we listen to someone else tell their story, or we see them in a particular situation, and we remove all judgment, we tune into that part of ourselves that have had similar experiences or events, where we’ve been in a similar situation, and had the same type of thing happen to us, and we can relate and understand what they’re going through, and we can respond or interact in kind. When we look through the eyes of judgment, we still tap into that part of us that had a similar experience or was in a similar situation, that we deny having and therefore repress and don’t own it, because we judged ourselves while in that situation the same way we’re now judging someone else. Value judgment, for the most part is “taught”, and we usually grow up judging others in the same way we were judged. We literally “do unto others as it was done unto us”. Just as we were taught to feel bad about something we did, or see ourselves as a bad person for being that way or doing what we did, we disown those parts of ourselves, pretending and convincing ourselves were not that way, while building them into our mental model as a filtering system that we look through and project onto others, seeing those same behaviors and judgments in them.

       When we’re judged we’re literally being given the criterion and means for making judgments of other as an interpretation of “this means that”. Whenever someone does this or participates in that, it means this about them, and we perceive them through our judgments just as we were perceived by others who were judging us. We’re not only taught to judge as a fundamental way of perceiving, but given the criterion as our means of applying values that draw natural and consistent conclusions. Because this training comes as part of our formative conditioning and is developed as a subconscious process that forms our fundamental way of perceiving the world, we usually don’t even realize that’s what we’re doing. In this way, all value judgments, in their most basic sense, are a form of self-creating out of an unconscious state of learned behavior.

We often think judgments are the observation of an objective reality secured by a set of “golden rules’. We imagine that these values and rules are fact and true, rather than what they really are, which is something we made up or was trained to by the opinion of others and formed an agreement around by accepting them as our own. We’re given our values and ways of perceiving as behavioral dynamics through our childhood conditioning that we continue creating out of throughout our adult life. The inner child, so to speak, becomes the adult. However we’ve been trained up to the age of seven or eight becomes the core beliefs and mental model that we continue perceiving and creating out of the rest of our life in a natural and automatic manner.

Practicing Self-Awareness and Realization

There are several practices that you can routinely employ as a means of not only gaining self-awareness of what you’re actually doing in any situation, but also as a primary means of cultivating compassion. In any situation where you realize you’re forming a judgment of someone, regardless of what it is (remove all concepts of right and wrong), catch yourself, and turn inward instead and self-reflect. Ask yourself, have I had any experiences of a similar nature? Have I been in a similar situation? Did I explore the same idea at some point in my life? Tap into the same idea in yourself, in your own experience, and use it to relate to them. Give up the need for them to experience it in the same way that you did, or draw the same conclusions based on the same values and make the same decisions, and simply use it to understand where they’re at and what they’re going through as a lesson. Ask yourself . . . am I prone to the same thing? Have I explored and experimented with the same idea? Could this same type of thing happen to me?

As you tap into and touch on that same aspect in yourself, you have the means of relating to them, and understanding them as a result. You have to be honest with yourself and not see the conclusions you drew or decisions you made because of your experiences of the same nature as the means of denying ever having them. Or the idea that if you admit it, even to yourself, that it’ll mean something bad about you (usually the same thing you’re judging the other person with). Many times we judge others as being bad or wrong somehow due to experiences we’ve never had, so of course it’s difficult for us to relate or truly understand, and if we ever do find ourselves in a similar situation, rather than understanding, we usually condemn ourselves in the same manner we’re now condemning them.

If instead, we put ourselves in the same situation, by imagining the same thing happening to us, or listening to their story and experiencing it as it was for them, we gain an understanding of them and ourselves at the same time. We can relate to how they feel, and feel a sense of compassion towards them as a result. By living out experiences with others, we gain insights into ourselves “through” them. We’re afforded the lesson without having to have the actual experience. This is the value of stories, folklore, and myths; we get to learn through someone else’s experience. Nowadays we get much the same thing out of watching movies and reading novels.

Summary:

Whatever state of mind we possess and cultivate at any given moment, become our perceptual lens, and we only “see” in everyone and everything what matches it. If we look through the lens of judgment, we see only what warrants judgment, and we remain disconnected from those same aspects in ourselves. As we judge others, we simultaneously judge ourselves in the same manner. We shape ourselves and others according to our judgments. All perception is projection. We’re only capable of seeing in others what exists in us.

If we look through the eyes of reverence and compassion, we likewise, only see what warrants that. When we go into any relationship or situation with an attitude of understanding, we “connect with others” at an entirely different level, and connect with and touch on those same ideas and qualities within ourselves, learning about ourselves in a new way. Just as we form an understanding of others, and see them as they really are when we relinquish judgment, we come to understand and truly know ourselves to the same degree. Through understanding and compassion towards others and ourselves, we form a natural love for them and ourselves. We can only truly love what we understand and relate to, because all love comes only through union with ourselves in others. We can only love others to the same extent that we love ourselves.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

Archetypes as Laws and Principles that Provide Tools for Personal Transformation

In order to gain an understanding of how archetypes work in our psychological make-up, we have to start by defining what an archetype is. An archetype is what’s used in the most primary sense to illustrate or represent natural principles and laws. An archetype represents a kind of prototype, universal template, or ideal that we use for creating in every aspect of our life. As multidimensional, multifaceted beings, our personality and psychological make-up is comprised of universal archetypes that we share with all of humanity, represented by the zodiac and the ancient gods of Mythology. An archetype as a principle is represented as an “idea” or “being” that has certain types of attributes, qualities and characteristics, that form its basic personality giving it a natural disposition, temperament, perspective and “type” or kind of behaviors that naturally lend themselves to telling a certain type of story as it’s “identity”.

Our basic psychological make-up as our personality is formed by the twelve universal (everyone has them) archetypes of the zodiac as personality traits in varying degrees and aspects that are composed into a “formula” as our primary “state of consciousness”.  As we go out into the world and begin participating in co-creating reality, this state of consciousness as our personality acts to predetermine and form our “identity” as the roles we naturally cast ourselves in or take on, and the type of story we tell by how we express our character traits and live our life. In order to change the character traits that make up our personality and identity, we have to work by way of these same principles as archetypes by reformulating them.

The ultimate form of transformation as self-development, doesn’t come by changing individual or select behaviors, habits, or tendencies, though it can be in the ordinary sense, but rather by working with attributes and qualities that form new characteristics. By evolving characteristics that form our personality and have natural behaviors inherent in them as a “way of being”, we naturally produce new experiences that give us a new and different “sense of ourselves”, that simultaneously produces a new kind of reality as the story we naturally begin telling through our newly acquired perceptions and behaviors. “Being” always produces “doing”, and doing always results in physical manifestation.

To work through principles says that the way to change how something or someone functions and performs, and the reality they create through the story they naturally tell as a result, is to work with their character and nature to alter, modify and reformulate its inherent properties and elements. By adjusting and modifying the qualities one expresses through, we change the entire operation. So instead of trying to change one aspect within a whole, natural operation, often without ever identifying what attribute is ultimately causing it, you work instead to adjust the inner nature as their character, and let the changes that ensue from it naturally take place. Then evaluate them to determine if or what other attributes need to be adjusted, until it naturally acts to produce the change you want. All change ultimately comes in a natural and permanent manner by changing the character of the person forming the behaviors that you desire to change. All other methods may solve a specific application or instance, but the behavior and tendency itself will continue to play out in others ways.

What’s referred to in Alchemy as the “chemical marriage”, comes through coupling, combining, and assimilation of its equal and complementary opposite. Transformation takes place by mingling, blending, and combining contradictory opposites to form a new whole. By returning what is fixed and dead to a fluid and growing state. When we assume habitual qualities that make up our character and nature, and fail to grow in the essential sense of our inner self, we become as dead matter, measured only by quantity and proportion. We stagnate and begin living a life of routine and dogma, performing the same rituals day after day in an automatic way, and begin living out of the same mindset telling ourselves the same story day in and day out.

When we stop growing, learning, and becoming something new and different in each moment, we begin the process of withering and dying. All behaviors and habits are merely the expression of established and well-practiced qualities that make up our character. So the way to change a habit, specific behavior, or tendency, isn’t to work directly with it in the practical sense of breaking a pattern to form a new one, but rather by identifying what part of your nature is producing that behavior as a natural expression and working through the law of sympathy and antipathy to modify it. It’s only by changing our inner nature somehow that we change our outer expression which is what produces our experience of reality.

        Qualities exist as attributes that are polar in nature as complementary opposites that form extremes of each other, with a gradient scale between them as degrees. We seldom ever fall exclusively on one side or the other, but rather somewhere in between, and express in favor of one extreme or the other under different circumstances. Many behavioral tendencies come more as a dynamic and interactive combination of qualities that must be worked with as groups or complementary clusters rather than as singular in nature, although often what is spurned as a quality actually results from a “core or parent” quality, which, when transformed, changes all offspring produced by it systematically.

For example, jealousy and envy, whose opposite is admiration and trust, may be the offspring of self-doubt, lack of confidence, and low self-worth, and until this is addressed and transformed, the jealousy won’t go away. At best it’ll be repressed and subdued or corrected (seemingly) in one situation, while still existing as a tendency and natural perception in any other situation that warrants it, because what’s “causing it” hasn’t been changed. Once self-worth has been transformed into a healthy state of confidence, self-love and admiration, the tendency towards jealousy in all areas dissipates and is no longer apart of personal awareness and feelings. In other words, the person no longer feels that way in situations that used to warrant a deep feeling of jealousy and envy.

To breed confidence in place of being timid and feeling unsure of yourself requires working with believing in yourself, trusting yourself, and honoring your uniqueness. Just trying to correct the behavior itself by telling them (or yourself) to not be timid or afraid, or by making them feel bad somehow for being that way, not only doesn’t transform it, but can in fact compound and exaggerate it, making it even worse. Qualities as our inner nature and personality form an interactive model as a cluster of qualities that have been developed through an active and expressive state to produce our experiences. We form beliefs about and around ourselves and others through the active expression of innate qualities being brought out in us through the dynamics, conditions, and life situations we grew up in, that served to establish our initial personality as traits and characteristics we naturally possess and outwardly express in a fluent manner as adults.

       All of these active, well-developed qualities have their complementary opposites, which also exist within us in a latent state, and can be used in a strategic manner to transform them. We simply have to realize it, form a desire and intention to perfect ourselves, and use our will creatively to transform our character into new habits. We “become” whatever we form a habit of. By intentionally working to develop ourselves by embodying and acting out counteractive qualities, and practicing “being that way”, we transform and evolve our perceptions, how we “sense ourselves”, and how we feel about ourselves. For example, just by changing our posture from a slumped one to an erect one, back straight, head held up high, making eye contact, all characteristics of “confident behavior”, we actually feel more confident. As we feel more confident, we create an experience of ourselves as “being” confident, and we start acting that way more and more, until it becomes a natural part of who we are in the most ordinary sense.

All qualities have a state-of-mind and physiological characteristics associated with them. By becoming an actor in our own life, so to speak, we can imagine the state-of-mind out of which confidence would be the result, and by employing the behaviors and postures that communicate and outwardly demonstrate confidence, and “become” confident. We can actively choose to embody that state and quality of being, and act it out as a means of expressing ourselves in some situation, as the basis for creating an experience of ourselves in that manner. If we feel we don’t know how to be, feel, and act confident, we can find someone that we consider confident and self-assured, study them to see what they’re attitude, frame of mind, physiology (the way they hold themselves, gestures, facial expressions, voice tone and quality, etc.), and how they act, then we can model them by “pretending” to be the same way. Just like when we were kids and we developed ourselves by pretending to be just like our favorite characters. This whole process of self-development is natural to us as children when we’re in a primary state of creating ourselves using our imagination, but we tend to lose this ability as we become adults. As adults, we’ve established patterns and instead of taking an attitude of “creating new memories”, we begin simply living out of the memories already created in a repetitive fashion, feeling and being the same way over and over, creating the same type of experiences in the present as in the past, and we stop growing as a result.

While the subconscious mind, which forms our personality, is habitual in nature, working to create and behave in an automatic fashion based on memory as habits, it’s also passive and receptive in nature, lacking a will of its own, and can be directed by the conscious mind to employ new qualities, behave in new ways as the expression of those qualities, and form new memories that will become new habits as a natural way of being. We don’t always need to go through years of therapy in an attempt to try and resolve or understand our story about things and what happened to us, and why we became the way we are. Sometimes all we have to do is realize as adults we still have the ability to create ourselves in any way we want to by simply detaching from the past and our story about it, deciding what aspects of ourselves we want to grow and transform into something better and greater, set the intention to do so, then begin the work of practicing in a disciplined manner to become it.

       We can bring what’s in a fixed and established state back into a fluid and growing state. We can realize who we’ve become up to this point, and who we want to be instead, or in moving forward to continue the process of actively developing ourselves. We see ourselves and our life as a “work in progress” of continuous and never-ending growth. Not as “being” a certain way, but rather in a continuous state of “becoming”. We can decide what story we want to tell by how we live our life, and what “kind” of person we have to become in order to do that. We can move outside of the mindset that says we’re always determined by other people, by how they act and treat us, or by what situations we found ourselves in or acted unknowingly to create, and begin taking an attitude instead of being responsible for our own development and who we become by way of our own willful decisions and disciplined actions. We can disconnect from all the memories and illusions of the past, be present in the moment, and become aware of ourselves in terms of how and who we’re being, and “in that awareness”, actively choose how we’re going to be, regardless of others and what’s happening around us.

We can detach from our emotional connection to others that keep us constantly affected by and responding to them, reside apart from them as our own person, and choose how we’re going to interact accordingly. We’re only affected by people because as children in our “formative years”, only our subconscious was fully developed and dominantly active and we were constantly taking in the suggestions and attitudes of others and using them to shape ourselves in relation with them. This tendency becomes established as a way of self-development, so that even when the self-conscious aspect of the mind develops to the point of being active and dominate as our awareness, which has the ability to judge and decide what to let in or keep out, we continue acting to develop in an unconscious manner. Once we develop a conscious mind, which separates us from our parents and others and gives us the ability to think for ourselves, discriminate and reason, and act based on choice and will to give suggestions to our own subconscious mind as a way of self-development instead of other-development, we acquire the ability to become self-determined.

The problem is, by the time we’ve become adults it’s become a habit as an automatic process of stimulus – response, action – reaction, and we don’t realize that we now have a will and can act independent of others in determining our own psychological makeup. We can finally realize that who others are, how they’re being towards us, and what they think of us has nothing to do with us, unless we let it by engaging through a reactive, like-response. As soon as we realize this, break the unconscious emotional connection, and see ourselves as a part from others, where their behavior and attitude no longer produces a reaction in us, we step into our true power to decide in every moment who and how we’re going to be, then act it out producing an experience of ourselves as being that way.

Summary:

All transformation comes as an “inside job”. It comes through transforming the qualities that make up our character that naturally produce all of our perceptions and behaviors as a natural way of being that serve to tell a story of some kind. We don’t transform by addressing specific behaviors, but rather by working with the personality traits and character that act to naturally produce them as a tendency. By changing our “core” or kernel, we change how it expresses outwardly and what it acts to create through behaviors and deeds of some sort. Archetypes are tools for transformation because they provide us with a dynamic system of what qualities and personality traits produce what type of behaviors that naturally perform a stylized operation as a thematic story-line.

All qualities exist in polarity, with a wide range of degrees and variances in between, and can be modified by employing their opposite and contradictory aspect. All vibration as a pattern is altered by coupling with a similar, yet variable pattern of the same nature, where different degrees of the same quality are being expressed, that allows it to acquire and take on new attributes. We train and condition ourselves to new ways of being by modeling the qualities necessary until they become a natural part of us. Whatever we pretend to be, we become. Pretending and playacting is the key to personal transformation and developing your character in a natural and deliberate way.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

Alchemy and the Process of Initiation – Transformation and Growth through Challenges and Ordeals

The ancient art known as “Alchemy” dealt with the idea of soul purification and self-creation through masterful use of the will. It works through Universal Laws that govern all of the material world as a primary form of mind-over-matter, or the mind’s ability to willfully direct the behaviors of the body (subconscious) and determine what type of energies as states of consciousness we take on, become one with, and bring into expression as a way of creating ourselves by way of them. It works through the same laws that govern the chemistry of the body, where, when two or more substances are combined, they form a chemical reaction as biological processes of transformation. All change and transmutation comes from new combinations of some kind that form new relationships as a unique variable that alters it from its original state.

The alchemical process acts first to “purify” the substance (soul) to be transformed through various forms of changing the solution by filtering and separation, that identify and remove all impurities acquired through previous combinations and amalgamations, returning it to its virgin state. This process takes repeated steps of breaking down existing conditions and established patterns as active qualities, refining them through a process of distillation, and removing all corrupt aspects as weaknesses, vices, and vulnerabilities. Once returned to its original state, the true aspects of its character can then fully express and be developed into strengths as the means of true self-creation that comes from self-awareness, self-knowledge, and intentional actions and deeds. We can then act “on ourselves” to develop ourselves in very distinct ways by choosing what qualities we want to intentionally embody, become one with, and bring into expression as a way of apprehending those qualities and developing our character to include them.

       The Law of the Tetragrammaton or Tetrad (4), demonstrates this process and method of “becoming” through the Dyad (Vesica Pisces) as the blending together of two energy fields, joined at the center, where outside energies serve to stimulate and awaken those same energies in us, and together in the overlapping area, form an interference pattern as the reconfiguration of that pattern in both to form a new variation. This new variation of the same quality and idea, births the Triad as its offspring as an inner or imagined idea that provides the subconscious pattern for producing its outer equivalent as a projection or reflection, birthing its correspondence as an outer expression or experience of reality, represented by the Tetrad.

This same principle is demonstrated in the most primary law of all, the Law of Vibration, which states that whenever we vibrate in harmony with something else, we act to magnetically draw it into us through sympathetic induction, blending with it, and both of our complementary, yet variable vibrations influence each other and begin vibrating in-sync, forming coherence as a new vibratory rate that together forms a new pattern. This law forms the very foundation as a guided process for not only realizing “how” we’re being shaped all the time by whatever we associate and interact with energetically, but for how to engage in and use that same process intentionally as a means of developing ourselves.

The same process of returning a solid substance to a fluid state, purifying it by breaking down and dissolving all impurities and corruption, then reforming it through new combinations, occurs naturally in life anytime we’re faced with challenges, ordeals, major life crisis, and extreme forms of hardship and loss, where we’re forced to reevaluate our life and values, and embrace our identity with a full sense of awareness. It’s easy to see that the only time we change or grow in some way, is when we have to in order to overcome or negotiate a new situation that presents a problem or unfamiliar territory. It’s only when we’re taken out of our comfort zone, our ordinary conditions, circumstances, and situations that we’ve become accustomed to, and thrown into brand new, unexpected situations that we’re forced to respond by acting in a new and deliberate way. Where we go through the process in our mind of not knowing what to do, no previous experience or memory to draw off of or repeat, and we go through a decision process that requires us to willfully act it out, usually going against our own natural and habitual tendencies. Only in these moments are we truly self-creating in a fully aware manner. We’re initiating and producing our own reality that brings us into a new feeling and sense of ourselves. We embody qualities that we’ve never really expressed or developed before, and they transform us as a result. While in these moments, we’re back into a position, often for the first time as an adult, of having to make conscious decisions in every instance of what we’re going to do, how we’re going to be, and what we’re going to act intentionally to create.

        The process of initiation in the ancient mysteries, prepared the initiate by putting them in extremely challenging situations that were designed to invoke extreme fear and a deep sense of insecurity, which revealed their will to either give-up or give-in, or to persevere and push through difficulties, developing great mental fortitude through the process. The object was to not only become fearless, but to also be able to remain calm, highly focused, clear minded, and confident in extreme situations of all kinds. This came through the ability to not allow the energy challenging you to enter into your sphere of consciousness and alter your state of mind to match and be “like it”. This is what you might call a form of reverse engineering of the initial process of alteration through “combining and coupling” represented by the Dyad. In this process you deflect the energy, keeping it outside of you, refrain from reacting to it in any manner while staying centered and grounded internally, and in doing so, you neutralize the energy and act instead to influence and direct it through your mental projections and actions.

All of life evolves out of various combinations as the relationships of complementary opposites that act on each other to transform each other to be more alike. Every person or being that we meet or interact with, is acting naturally just through the nature of the interaction to make us like them, and we act to make them like us. This is what all relationships are, a natural method of transformation through adaptation and modification that (re)forms a new whole as a variation. This process is always going on between us and everything around us all the time at the subconscious, unaware level of the mind. We are constantly absorbing, integrating, assimilating, and becoming “like” the energy around us as a basic form of evolution that keeps us in the same state and condition as the environment we exist in, function as a part of, and have to survive in. Once we fully understand this law and fact, we have the tools necessary to work by way of that same law to consciously direct and influence the operation.

All energy is a form of consciousness that exists as “qualities” and feelings that naturally produce certain types of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. The spiritual-energetic world exists in a parallel dimension to the physical as a hierarchical structure. Whatever exists on a “lower plane” is fully contained within the higher plane as its foundation. The higher plane, which contains the entire lower plane, is what acts to govern and sustain that plane. The invisible plane of energy, which is consciousness, is what shapes matter as essence into form through imagined thoughts. An idea introduced into the mind as a frequency or feeling, stimulates and initiates a thought process that forms it into an image of some kind as a reality in the mind’s eye (3rd eye), that’s further developed and evolved through a narration as internal dialogue. The entire physical, manifest world is produced and animated by consciousness as thought, intention, and imagination. And it’s through this same process, by working with the laws of the higher plane governing the lower plane that we direct and work with the energies of the lower plane.

       Once we return to a virgin state through the process of being broke down through constant challenges and crisis, where all illusions that prevented us from seeing ourselves and life as it really is dissolve, revealing only what’s real and eternal and unchangeable, we’re in the position to not only take over control of our own development, but can develop the necessary capacities of the mind that prevent us from being influenced, altered, and corrupted by others. All energy as states that produce emotional realities can be directed and brought into a submissive state by the will. We can control and regulate all energy within our own mental sphere (immediate surroundings) by exercising our will to direct it. This is not the same thing as “imposing our will on others” in an attempt to control and influence them to think, feel, and behave in a certain way, but rather to exercise full dominion over ourselves and our own mind and soul. Alchemy doesn’t concern itself with the idea or need to somehow change others, but only with the mastery necessary to become fully self-determined and self-controlled. The best way we have of influencing others is by controlling our own state and behaviors in how we interact with them, which influences them to “match us”.

Once we realize that our mind exists as a spherical field of energy that not only permeates and surrounds our body, encapsulating it, but also extends out into the environment around us quite some distance, and is always mingling with and taking on the energy of everything else, we can begin acting deliberately to regulate our energy field by using our will and imagination to determine what we allow in to become a part of us, and what we keep out or deflect, so it doesn’t affect or alter us. If we learn how to tune into the energy in any situation and become aware of how it interacts with us to transform us through resonance, we can learn how to “sense it” by feeling it while imagining its quality, motives, and behavior, while keeping it “outside of us”. We can then realize that people who are willfully projecting through some form of intensity, and those who live out of and are always expressing and projecting strong emotions of some sort, can only “enter into us” and infect us, becoming a part of our mind, if we choose to let them.

Energetic interactions take place naturally at the subconscious level, where, even though we realize how strongly we’re affected by them, we don’t realize what’s actually going on in the objective sense. We don’t realize that by becoming aware of what operates at the unconscious level, we can learn how to work with it consciously (with awareness). We can imagine an invisible barrier around us as the outer edge of our mental sphere where ideas and emotions being projected at us by others are allowed to reflect and “spread out” so we can see them as if “looking through a transparent image”, where we can “read them accurately” while preventing them from entering our mind and altering our state accordingly. By practicing this, we can remain calm, centered, and unaffected while in the midst of extremes and intensity of any kind. By remaining neutral in the presence of projected emotions we act to neutralize and diffuse them. But most importantly, we exercise the ability to regulate our own mind and body. This is a key ability of vital importance in terms of intentional self-creation.

        In this same manner we can consciously choose energy that we do want to blend with and become one with as a means of intentionally acquiring the same qualities. While we tend to use terms like “acquire”, “apprehend”, or” get”, to describe the energy and consciousness we embody as a means of developing qualities in ourselves, the fact is we don’t ever “get energy” as qualities “from” something else outside of us, but they act instead, through resonance, to “awaken” and bring into an active state those same qualities that are already “in” us. We then develop them through repetitive expression to become a prominent part of our character. Anything that we consistently develop through expression and interaction of some sort becomes a habit as second nature, which means we begin doing it naturally in an automatic fashion without direct awareness, having to think about it, or exerting intentional effort.

This same process of union as combining and coupling with someone or something else as the natural means of transforming and growing, is represented in what’s called the “chemical marriage” of Alchemy, as the relationship between the active and passive forces of the same mind and soul, and the conscious minds ability to direct, guide, and create by way of the subconscious mind as a unified and harmonious act. It’s learning how to make an adjustment through an understanding of sympathy and antipathy, attraction and repulsion, magnetizing and projecting. By learning how to use our own personal will to seed and work to create through our subconscious, we create both ourselves and our reality in an intentional and purposeful manner.

       Likewise, the burning away of impurities as character flaws, unconscious complexes and tendencies, incorrect evaluations and calculations, or bad habits we developed as unconscious conditioning, we can resolve our bad (self-destructive) karma and create a more positive and beneficial form of karma. Redemption comes by first bringing what’s operating in our life unconsciously into conscious awareness where we can not only see what we’re doing and why, but we can also begin working with it consciously to resolve it. All manifestations produced by actions can be cancelled out and brought back into a balanced state by equalizing opposites. It’s only by realizing and owning our own part in things that we see clearly what we’re doing in any situation that acting to co-create it, whether passively or actively, that we can willfully change our own perceptions and behaviors. It’s by counteracting an idea that we transform it by reformulating it, bringing what’s out of balance (emphasized) and being done unconsciously back into balance through awareness that brings realization. The realization alone is what acts to dissolve and transform the illusion. To redeem ourselves from an attitude and the actions that result from it, is to form and embody the opposite attitude and action, and repeat it consistently until it becomes automatic and something that we do without thinking about it. We can only be transformed and evolved by what becomes a habit as an essential part of our nature (through reprogramming our subconscious).

Those of us who came into this life with many difficulties, challenges, and ordeals to overcome, are naturally walked through a process of initiation as soul purification, often without realizing it. Others intentionally choose a hard life because there’s a desire in them to meet and overcome difficulties. Still others refuse to compromise their dignity in a world that teaches conformity at the cost of morality, and in doing so, welcome the consequences of integrity, which can often seem brutal. All growth and development, in the sense of being the soul’s only true goal and purpose in life, is considered an act of love from a higher, spiritual perspective. It’s only when we’re challenged and overwhelmed and we reign as victor, that we’re exalted. The greater our fall, the more exalted our rising. It’s only when we push through tremendous odds, and when faced with devastation and wrought with unimaginable grief, in those darkest moments when we’re forced to reach down into our unknown depths of our self to find our true source of light and power that we ascend to the higher rungs by virtue of our own volition.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

 

The Shadow and the Ego – Self-Creation and the Art of Personal Transformation

The soul exists essentially as threefold in nature between multiple planes, and as “dual” in nature within the material plane.  All of life as we know it is comprised of both masculine and feminine energy as an inner and outer aspect of the same mind or idea. This same principle is playing out in the dual aspects of the conscious and subconscious mind, the Cerebellum and Cerebrum, the right and left hemisphere of the brain, and in sexual gender. The soul, which is archetypal in nature, is always acting “on itself” to “create itself”. It’s essentially comprised of both a higher and lower nature that it brings together as an integrated “whole”. The Soul self- creates using both the subconscious and self-conscious mind, which together as a whole create our entire experience of what we call reality as both an inner and outer experience of the same nature and thematic idea, symbolized in Sacred Geometry by the Monad.

The most fundamental form of self-creation comes through the feminine and masculine process of “relating and contrasting”. We can only “know ourselves” as something specific by how we enter into relationship with that same idea in everything else. All ideas (archetypes) are dual and polar in nature and form “extremes” as opposites aspects of the same overall pattern that are complementary to one another. One acts to provoke and call forth the other one, where it shapes and defines itself in contrast and comparison to the other. All ideas are created through combinations that form a dynamic chain of cause and effect, where every idea requires a cast of stars and various personalities in order to play out as an experience of themselves “being that way”.

The higher soul, which possesses and operates both the subconscious and conscious aspects of the same material mind, divides and creates itself as two separate entities; one known and accepted as being desirable, the other sealed in darkness and judged as being evil and therefore unwanted and rejected. These two aspects of us form almost entirely different “personalities” whose existence depends on one another. By revealing and acknowledging one, we simultaneously undermine, contradict, and dissolve the other one. Both of these aspects form a “false image” because they’re based on partial information and don’t include the “whole person”. They’re articulately shaped and developed through a process of discrimination, choice, and will, where through various forms of “judgment” that separate out what actually exists as a whole into individual parts, that it then picks and chooses what to include and what to leave out. What’s good and deemed worthy we keep and include, and what’s bad and deemed evil or ugly, we reject and ostracize. Through this process of self-judgment and natural selection, we begin neatly fashioning opposing aspects of ourselves as our ego and our shadow, both formed and developed through the same act.

The Nature of Judgment

The idea of judgment has a tendency to always be used in a negative way to indicate placing a value judgment on someone else for traits they don’t outwardly display, yet the act of using judgment is a fundamental process for making decisions and what we choose or don’t choose for ourselves, and how we ultimately shape ourselves accordingly. To use “good judgment” means you’ve evaluated the situation in terms of morality, actions, and the consequences it’ll produce, and are making an objective decision as a result. To be “judgmental” means that we project qualities and traits onto a person that they don’t actually have as a way of perceiving and experiencing them. We look “through the eyes” of our judgments as a way of seeing others, and as a result, never really see who they actually are as a person, but rather who we are as a person by how we make them out to be.

As kids growing up, we’re conditioned and “given” or trained to a “value system” that forms the basis of all discretion. We’re taught what’s good and what’s bad, what’s right and wrong, and what it is that if we do it makes us a “good person” and what it is that if we do it makes us a “bad person”. What will bring us the attention we desire, make us feel loved and adored, an accepted part of a group, or what will cause us to be disliked and ignored, ridiculed and criticized, and ultimately cast out and not wanted. As we encounter situations and ideas that appeal to certain parts of us, we contemplate those parts and what kind of activity is involved in them while simultaneously realizing what kind of person we’ll be if we embody and express them. We use the criteria we’ve been programmed with to judge ourselves according to those standards, and whatever we judge as being bad and evil, we refuse to express or be that way, and so we deny having those qualities and traits, disowning and repressing them where they still remain an inherent part of our subconscious makeup, and we begin fashioning another aspect of ourselves in contrast to it.

Creating the Shadow and the Ego

Many have been taught to believe that the idea of the “ego” is a bad thing that we should work at dissolving, getting rid of, or even “kill it” because it’s a false image of ourselves that we mistake for being real and create ourselves out of as a result. Yet the term ego is synonymous with “identity” which is something we’re always creating just through the nature of our experiences. Like everything else in the material world, it’s a product of our soul and mind, which is what’s producing the entire material world. We create experiences as the natural expression and operation of our mind, then “sense ourselves” within those experiences, and form an idea or image of ourselves “as” a certain type of person. As a soul we create ourselves to be an archetype (god) by how we combine universal archetypes as attributes, qualities, and characteristics to form a new and unique personality. Out of our personality comes our identity as a natural outgrowth. Our personality, which is a product of our subconscious mind as all our natural tendencies and behaviors that we’ve fully integrated up to that point, lend itself to telling a natural story as the “theme” of its very perception of the outer world. How we are inwardly forms and produces the world we see outwardly as its polar or complementary opposite.

As we begin picking and choosing which aspects of ourselves we’ll keep and allow, and which ones we won’t, we begin neatly fashioning both our shadow and our ego as opponents or natural enemies of each other. As we shape one, we simultaneously shape the other to be its opposite. Whatever we judge harshly in ourselves and deny having by refusing to express it as a way of creating our outer image of ourselves, becomes our shadow or hidden self as our “dark side”, and whatever we accept and consider good and choose to openly and outwardly express becomes or ego, both of which are “false images” because they’re both based on only partial elements of our whole makeup.

Naturally, because shaping one automatically determines the other, anytime we’re looking to transform one, we automatically transform the other one by the same means. Because the most primal motive of the subconscious mind is “self-preservation” (it maintains habits and well established patterns as a means of self-creating), and becoming aware of the shadow while embracing it instead of rejecting it can mean dismantling and dissolving the ego, there’s a lot of resistance from the ego to maintain the shadow instead. In this way, integration of the shadow can represent death of the ego. The ego is such a well-defined idea about ourselves that when it’s undermined, it can throw us into a form of identity crisis. The process of synthesizing our dark side into our self-made image causes us to undergo a natural process of transformation as self-awareness and realization that integrates and therefore dissolves the shadow while reforming the ego to a unified whole by bringing latent qualities into outward expression.

Identity Crisis and Death of the False Ego

An identity crisis comes whenever what we’ve used to build our sense of self around either ends, abruptly changes, or is transformed through natural means of some kind. This comes in the most natural sense through the roles we play in life and what it is that drives our behaviors and gives our life meaning. When we have a family, we play a role in that family and build our identity around and out of it. When we’re in a romantic, long term relationship or marriage, we build our identity out of the role we play and how we experience ourselves in that relationship. When we work a career or certain position for years, we create ourselves according to or by way of that activity. When any of these change, and we no longer play the same roles in the same type of situations, we go through a temporary phase of not knowing what to do, or who we are, and what it is that gives our life purpose.

As we begin establishing our ego out of the accepted and embraced parts of ourselves, convincing ourselves that we don’t possess the traits we judge as being “bad and wrong”, and we build our “sense of self” out of our self-created experiences by way of expressing only certain aspects of ourselves, we create what we can call a “false image” of ourselves because it’s only based on selected parts. As we begin becoming aware of our shadow aspects, and instead of judging and denying them, we acknowledge and embrace them; we begin naturally transforming the ego through their integration, which changes and enhances our ability to express ourselves, what we’re outwardly capable of, and how we create experiences of ourselves as a result. By creating new types of experiences, we simultaneously reshape ourselves according to those experiences.

When this is done with full awareness and in an intentional manner, we can use it as the means to invigorate the ego and expand our range of expression. Because these are aspects of ourselves that we’ve never actually expressed, we can feel very awkward and uncomfortable, as if we don’t know “how to be”, which can cause us to abandon the idea and revert back to our comfort zone of our known and integrated aspects. Yet, because our shadow was established as a child out of our formative conditioning, as adults revisiting the same idea, we may find very natural and healthy ways of expressing those same qualities in a way that’s entirely congruent with our perception of who we are. All qualities of being and personality traits have their appropriate expression in the right context and within the appropriate situation. If we’ve judged it to be bad and wrong, it’s because we were looking at it through the wrong context, or the situation we were contemplating it in wasn’t appropriate for expressing it. Under the right context, any idea and the actions that ensue from it can be considered appropriate and beneficial somehow.

We all have multiple traits and tendencies for a reason, and our job is to simply find the appropriate means of expressing them in a way that’s congruent with all other aspects of ourselves. As we refrain from some while indulging in others, we create a kind of gap and imbalances that can make them seem difficult to reconcile. When we perform the behaviors of our shadow aspects and create the type of experiences they bring, we judge ourselves as being bad and wrong for doing it and we’re filled with conflict, guilt and shame as a result. As we do behaviors that are “contrary” to our normal personality, it clashes with our self-image and we begin beating ourselves up for it. Guilt and shame is like a cancer that eats away at our soul, greatly affecting our ability to express ourselves in new and novel ways. They come as the result of us “judging ourselves” in the same manner we were judged by others. As we were judged, we in turn judged ourselves in the same way, and that became the basis for us judging others, all using the same criteria.

Projection, Reaction, and how we Judge Others

All perception comes by way of our “perceptual lens” which is a filtering system based on our mental paradigm. We are always looking “through our mind” as a way of perceiving the outer reality. Our mind is comprised of both subconscious and conscious content. So we not only see what we’re aware of and accept as being true, but we also see what we’re not aware of and deny as being real or true. Because we still “disown” and fail to recognize all of our unconscious traits, we project them onto and see them in others, and form a strong reaction to them as “judging them” for having the same traits that we ourselves have that we’re not aware of having. We judge them according to the same values and beliefs and in the same way we judged ourselves. Content that we’re aware of and accept without judgment is projected also, but we don’t have an adverse reaction to it, we see it as normal. So through this psychological process, we literally judge others as a form of self-judgment. We make them out to be bad for outwardly expressing the same qualities that we ourselves secretly possess.

The nature of reality is formed by the projection and expansion of the psyche as both known and unknown aspects of us. An “aspect” is referring to attributes, qualities, traits, characteristics, tendencies, and desires that all lead to “being and behaving a certain way”. Whatever aspect of ourselves we’re embodying at any given moment determines how we’re being, what we’re doing, and what type of activities we naturally engage in. All of which combined create our experiences as an ongoing storyline out of which we shape ourselves. As we create certain types of experiences, we sense ourselves within those experiences as being a certain way. We create ourselves as a soul with an ego and a shadow, a good guy and a bad guy, by what we willingly embrace, embody, and bring into expression as an experience of ourselves. As long as both aspects are maintained through a lack of awareness and conscious use of will, we are never expressing to our highest potential or “becoming” our true, whole self as our soul. In order to embrace and utilize our full potential as a soul, we have to integrate all aspects of ourselves into the same idea and identity in a way that’s congruent and harmonious, eliminating all inner conflict and judgment of others. This self-awareness and process of synthesis produces a natural form of transformation that moves us from a fragmented state to a state of wholeness.

The Law of Vibration

One of the most basic ways to understand the nature of subtle energy (Soul) is to look at it in its most basic essence as vibration (our mind is a field of information vibrating at a certain frequency). All vibration has a “pattern” inherent in it along with a “self-organizing” mechanism that automatically organizes all essence, light, and matter into holographic structures as ideas of some kind. These ideas exist as what we commonly call “archetypes” which are not only ideas as a prototype or template for producing material forms, but also have active and passive properties that “animate them” with a certain type of personality or way of being. All archetypes are portrayed as mythological gods that are a natural part of our psyche. Each archetype has a personality as a combination of both positive and negative traits that serve to naturally express as a certain type of story that births or produces their identity as the “type of person” they are and what type of experiences they create by living them through a natural and spontaneous form of self-expression. Certain traits give us certain tendencies that we automatically act out under certain conditions and circumstances, and form certain types of operations or functions.

Likewise, our mind and soul also vibrate at a certain frequency producing a holographic structure that’s the dynamic integration and of all experience to produce memories as an accumulative summation. Because we look through and use this mind-field to perceive and interpret the world around us, we only see in everything else what exists as an essential part of our own psychological makeup. Because all of reality is produced through a form of “projection” and is organized to the same vibratory pattern as the mind viewing it, we can only serve to produce what’s of the same nature as we are.

What we refer to as the “mind”, which like the soul is also threefold in nature, exists on multiple levels and scales of existence at the same time and act to produce the same cohesive and coherent reality. The higher soul uses the vehicle of the mind to create the entire lower material world. It does this using both the conscious and subconscious aspects, where the subconscious is a part of the entire material realm of the plant and animal kingdom, and is what gives rise to the entire outer reality that’s then viewed by the conscious, self-aware aspect of the mind as an experience of itself in an expanded and more diverse form. So whatever is a part of the mind, whether conscious or unconscious, is what goes into creating our entire experience of what we imagine to be the outer reality of our inner world.

Using Spiritual Knowledge to Transform Yourself

Once we realize how this principle operates in our everyday awareness, we can use it as a tool for transforming ourselves. We can realize that anytime we’re having a strong reaction to someone and judging them as a result, that it’s showing us our shadow self. It’s allowing us to become aware of what lies within us, still actively expressing in a subliminal way to create us. Knowing this, we can turn our attention inward and examine our own judgments while allowing a natural chain of association to form that will lead us to the events of our life where we initially formed those judgments. We can sense those same aspects in ourselves that brought us the pain that caused us to disown them and repress them so far down within us that we forgot we had them. By becoming aware of the same qualities within us that formed the same judgments that we’re having towards another person, we can understand how we shaped ourselves according to those judgments.

The true secret to psychological healing is to bring what’s operating and creating in our life in an unconscious manner into conscious awareness. Just the awareness itself begins the process of integrating those aspects into our mental paradigm in a way that they can be congruently expressed in a healthy and beneficial way. All qualities, traits, and actions have an appropriate expression within the proper set of circumstances and situations. As we revisit these same ideas that we were trained to resist and repress as children, we can see them in a new light and use our discretion to determine how to embody and express them in such a way that it enhances and expands our range of expression to create new and unique types of experiences. As we relinquish judgment of ourselves and embrace our shadow, we simultaneously release those same judgments of everyone else and no longer have an adverse reaction to them. They become a natural part of our awareness, and they no longer stand out, and so we quit thinking about them because they no longer affect, and therefore determine us.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

 

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Auto-Suggestion and Affirmations – The Secret to Programming your own Subconscious Mind

Auto-suggestion works by way of the same principles that affirmations do as a form of guided meditation or subliminal conditioning. Our Higher Soul acts to operate both the subconscious and conscious aspects of the mind to both self-create and create our perception of the outer world. Like all entities and natural forces in the universe, the mind is dual in nature as masculine (conscious) and feminine (subconscious) aspects of the same thing, and work together in a harmonious way to create itself, others, and the world at large, all of which result from a form of self-perception. The brain, like the mind that operates and creates through it, is also dual in nature, where the conscious aspect of the mind works through the large brain as the cerebrum, which is the grey matter in the front of the head, and the subconscious works through the small brain or cerebellum, also called the reptilian brain, located in the back of the head attached directly to the brain stem and spinal cord. A further division as symmetry takes place through the polar aspects of the brain known as the “right” (feminine) and “left” (masculine) hemispheres, which again, perform different functions in creating a coherent experience of reality.

These dual aspects of the brain, like the dual aspects of the mind, act together to create a “whole self” or entity, while playing different roles, speaking different languages, performing different functions, and usually being completely unaware of each other because whenever one is active, the other one is passive. The conscious mind is secretly being run by the subconscious mind which forms our personality, formative conditioning, and habitual states and tendencies, and is what forms the basis for all of our outer perceptions. The conscious mind is what we experience as our normal or “waking” consciousness. When we’re awake we’re aware of our “self” and the outer world, whereas the subconscious is our most basic “being” that produces and regulates all natural biological functions of our body, all automatic and habitual behaviors, perceptions, and tendencies, and is emotionally driven and primarily “instinctual” in nature.

The subconscious mind is the primal mind that we share with the animal kingdom and all of Nature, and is what acts to produce and govern the entire material plane through active expression of “memory” of some kind, whether actual or simulated, that provide it with a thematic template or holographic, 3-D blueprint for organizing matter into interactive patterns as dynamic relationships. All natural and automatic behavior, as well as mood, emotional states and fundamental perceptions are produced and maintained by the subconscious in an automatic fashion as the means of creating reality in a consistent and congruent manner. The mind operates out of a “model” as our mental paradigm that serves to create on all levels of the material world simultaneously.

       In order to change any aspect of our material reality, we have to work through this mental model and change ourselves first.  All outer perception is a direct reflection and projection of our inner, self-perception. We use the same model to create and perceive ourselves as we do to create and perceive others and the world in general. So all transformation comes by way of working on ourselves to alter and modify our mental paradigm as our “model of the world”. We do this naturally all the time by readily accepting and taking in information of some kind that’s compatible with our model and by integrating it, use it to evolve and update our model. We’re constantly changing and becoming through what is largely an unconscious and natural process of programming our own mind by how we feel, think, imagine and fantasize, and through the perceptions, emotional states and actions they act together to naturally produce.

We are all equipped with the means for self-creating, and while we’re always involved in doing so in an unconscious and automatic way, we can also work by way of this same natural process to deliberately transform, grow, and develop ourselves as the means of intentionally creating ourselves and our experience of life. Our conscious and subconscious minds are designed to work together in a harmonious manner to create a unified self and perception of the outer world, but first we have to learn and work by way of the principles involved.  The mind and body, like all creative forces in the universe, operate according to principles, and in order to create in a conscious and deliberate manner we have to work by way of those same principles. Whenever we fail to recognize the laws working in any situation, and we attempt to work outside of or in contradiction to laws, we only end up working against ourselves by posing one aspect of ourselves against the other as adversaries and opponents.

The subconscious exists as the polar, yet complementary opposite of the conscious mind. This means one is produced or exists as the direct reflection of the other. The driving impulse of everything that’s undesirable to us, such as passions, shortcomings, bad traits, and weaknesses of various sorts, has its source in the subconscious. The driving force behind everything we don’t want to do and don’t wish for, lies in the subconscious, and so it’s here that it needs to be transformed. The conscious mind, which is the “I” as the self-aware, thinking, willful and discriminating mind has the ability through reason to “decide” and choose “how it wants to be”, is often directly opposed by and therefore over ruled by the subconscious, whose only directive is to maintain the status quo through a form of “self-preservation” as established and well maintained emotional states, habits, and tendencies.

       The subconscious, when not worked with properly, tends to be ill-disposed towards and acts to contradict and sabotage our conscious decisions and takes control of our will through passions and emotions that keep us doing the very things we don’t want to do, and creating ourselves and our life out of them as a result. Because the subconscious is the aspect of our mind that forms and gives birth to the material world, we have to not only render it harmless in order to achieve our goals, but we have to convince it to help us realize our wishes and partner with the conscious mind as the powerful ally that it is. In order to do this we have to look at what acts as a communication barrier between them, and learn the art of translating conscious goals into the language of the subconscious.

The conscious, self-aware, thinking mind, tends to be abstract and objective in nature, and exists fully within “time and space”, where it spends the better part of its time thinking about the past and future, and wastes it’s creative ability replaying memories of some kind over and over as the “means” of creating the same type of things in the present, reinforcing and strengthening them while setting the basis for creating more of the same thing in the future. The conscious mind is easily distracted and engages willingly in meaningless activities as a way of passing time and entertaining itself, and spends most of its time telling itself stories about things as fantasies that are born out of emotional states. It’s easily seduced by the emotional states of the subconscious and dwells endlessly in the mood or state of mind produced by its own illusions, usually without ever realizing that’s what’s actually happening. Thought and emotion are produced by each other, and work together to form all of our memories and fantasies. Memory and emotion are always directly connected and are what serve as the basis for instinct and creating out of an unconscious state where our thoughts are determined and driven by our emotions as primal forces that govern the entire physical plane.

This process, being dual and complementary in nature, works both ways, and whatever we dwell in and think about we form an emotional response to, and so we have the ability to actually direct and determine our emotional state through what we focus on and think about. Thought and emotion are always married to each other within the material plane, where one automatically produces and determines the other, and together they produce the “self” and the material reality of self-perception as their offspring. All creation and transformation involves bringing these two aspects into harmony with each other as a unified and coherent idea.

       The subconscious mind is the “unconscious” aspect of the mind in the sense that it fully operates to produce all instinctual, natural, and automatic activities and behaviors without our direct awareness or needing to think about them. It exists outside of time and space, and is always fully present and active in every moment. It never rests like the conscious mind, and even while the conscious mind sleeps it runs all of our biological processes and continues to produce reality through our dream states. It’s our “body consciousness” and is active and operating from the moment of conception to the moment of death. It’s emotionally driven through impulses, and communicates emotionally with everything around it, and while lacking a “will” like the conscious mind, operates and creates reality based on memory of some form. It’s creative in nature in terms of producing the entire material reality of the body, personality, natural behaviors, and the outer reality of perception, all of which are connected by and share in the same subconscious mind as the “collective unconscious”, yet lacks innovation, individuality, and being able to create something new and unique that it doesn’t have a model, pattern, or memory for.

All transformation and change in the material sense requires time and space in order to be produced and realized, because all newness is produced as an alteration of what already exists and evolves naturally out of an existing idea. If we set a goal for achieving something as a “future event”, something we’re “going to do”, or are “trying to do”, we program the subconscious mind with the idea of “going to” or “trying to”, and it creates the constant experience of trying without achieving. It’ll place constant obstacle directly or indirectly in our path as a form of self-sabotage or simply as the means of maintaining what has already been established. The subconscious, if not directed and given a pattern for what to create as a current reality and direct experience (without the passing of time), will nearly always succeed in overcoming us and causing us to fail, especially when willpower is under developed and weak, or we allow our emotional states to dictate what we focus on and think about.

The conscious, willful mind has the ability to impregnate the subconscious mind with a wish or goal that it will then use to systematically produce a material reality, but it has to deliver it through the shared medium of the imagination as an actual or already present experience by withdrawing the notion of time and space, and creating it as a form of virtual simulation or memory. The subconscious mind, which needs to be given the pattern (seed) for creating a material reality, doesn’t know the difference between an actual memory and an imagined one, because they’re both produced by the same means through the faculty of the imagination. Even actual experiences are turned into memories and “replayed” over and over “through” the imagination, which is what keeps the past alive in the present forming a consistent experience of reality. We have to create our wish as if it’s already real and happening in the present moment as a full sensory experience. When we seed the subconscious with a memory of the reality we want it to produce, we coordinate and align the two minds with the same idea. The subconscious produces it and the conscious mind perceives it.

       Auto-suggestion is a very basic “self-programming process” for modifying our mental paradigm through the incorporation of new information as an experience that becomes a part of its structural memory. The only way we ever “learn and grow” (evolve) is through experience of some kind that forms the memory as the perceptual programs that make up our infrastructure. We set a goal as a wish or desire for creating as an idea stated in the present tense, and then imagine it repeatedly and intensely in sensory terms as an actual experience of it. All memory, whether considered actual or self-produced, is created in the faculty of the imagination, where it’s then replayed as a means of providing the means for creating a consistent version of reality. The subconscious is thematic, allegorical, and metaphorical in nature, which means it’ll take an imaginary experience of reality and use it as an “archetypal idea” and create it in many different ways and on several different scales and levels simultaneously. It doesn’t need exact instructions or the actual situation in terms of details and absolutes, but only the symbolic idea of it as a theme, that it will then use to create more of the same type of experiences based on whatever environment, circumstances, or situations it’s operating in or based on what’s available as elements for creating the same type of idea in its immediate environment.

Formulating your Suggestion / Affirmation

Understanding the nature and relationship between the conscious and subconscious mind gives us distinct clues for how to structure the words or phrase used for the suggestion. The suggestion must always be present tense and spoken as a form of command, directive, or order (willfully as if it’s a fact). They must be stated as “I am” and NOT as “I will”. Nowhere in the statement do you ever involve what you “don’t want”. The subconscious doesn’t know how to process negatives and doesn’t operate by being told what “not to do”, but rather by being told what to do as a picture in the mind’s eye, because it speaks the language of images and symbols and creates whatever it imagines. The words spoken serve to form the image or reality in the imagination as the meaning of the words.

All wishes can only be for yourself and developing your character, and can’t involve other people or anything that’s outside of your control or that will require the will of others in order to accomplish. They should always involve a form of self-creation and provide the means for developing your own character or transform bad habits and tendencies or negative traits into positive and beneficial ones. You should start by identifying what you want to eliminate or change, and what it is you want to produce in their place. All change is really transformation of one idea into another one. Whatever idea you have a desire to create must be “believable” and not too far out of range from where you’re currently at. Drastic changes hardly ever come about in a natural and gradual way. All changes should be undertaken through a gradual step-by-step process as a logical progression rather than a giant leap from one extreme to another. These rules must be adhered to at all times in order to achieve success.

As you speak the wish in an authoritative manner to yourself, you picture it in your mind as an actual reality. You shape it and present it to yourself as if it’s real and you’re “in” the experience of it. You create a feeling and experience of yourself “being that way” by enhancing the sensory nature of it to create it as if it’s actually happening, and elicit the emotional state that’s a natural correspondence to it. Create it in your mind’s eye in a way that produces very positive and compelling emotions. Run this through your mind several times as you repeat the affirmation, until you get it just the way you want to experience it, then replay the perfected version several times in order to stabilize it as an actual memory that can be recalled at will.

Building it into the Muscle

Because the subconscious mind creates by way of repeating memories as thematic patterns over and over in a consistent and routine way, we have to replay our imagined, emotionally intense wish repeatedly over a period of time until it becomes automatic as a normal way of being. All habits require a time-frame of consistent replication in order to become permanent as a natural way of being and perceiving. The same principle is true for transforming habits. The number of times required and duration of imagining is 40 times per session. Four is the number of material reality that naturally progresses from three, which is the number of the creative imagination. This is why all processes that work to transform habits of any kind is 6 weeks (42 days) in duration, and why 21 days (past the half way mark) is the time required to establish one idea or routine in place of another. Anything practiced for 21 days becomes easy to do, and once practiced for 40 days becomes established as a new habit and we do it automatically through natural behaviors where intention, willpower and effort are no longer required.

An easy method of counting the number of times you’re repeating your affirmations without being distracted by having to think about it, is to create a string of 40 beads, or tie 40 knots in string, then, as you repeat it, count using the beads by moving from one to the next. Once you’ve repeated it to yourself 40 times while imagining it, you can consider a single session complete. You want to practice affirmations two to three times a day for 40 days, after which time your wish should be accomplished. Concentrate all of your effort on only one affirmation at a time and don’t move on to the next until you’ve accomplished it. The key to “mind over matter” is concentration without distraction or spreading yourself to thin by scattering and dispersing intentions.

Best Time of Day for Auto-Suggestion

There are two times of the day when we are in a natural hypnotic state of having both the conscious and subconscious active at the same time as a transition from a waking to sleeping state, and that’s when we fall asleep at night, and when we wake first thing in the morning. Do this exercise right before falling asleep in a soft whisper or simply in your thoughts. Every time you repeat, move your fingers to another bead, until you’ve repeated it 40 times. As you say or think the idea, imagine or visualize it as if your wish has already become a reality. Create it in your mind in such a way that you’re thoroughly convinced and believe it.

If you reach the end of your beads and you’re still not tired, continue thinking about it into your sleeping state. The object is to take the idea with you from your waking state to your sleeping state, then in the morning from your dream state to your waking state, impregnating the subconscious and coordinating the two states to the fulfillment of the same idea. If you fall asleep before reaching the end of your beads, the purpose will still be achieved. If you wake up in the middle of the night and can’t go back to sleep, repeat the suggestions until you fall asleep. Any idea that we’re thinking about as we fall asleep, we program our subconscious mind with.

What Type of Wishes can be Fulfilled

It’s very important to realize which wishes can be realized and which ones can’t. At no point should we attempt to exercise or project our will onto others in an attempt to change or control them somehow. Only the wishes that concern the spirit, soul, and body of the individual can be realized. Ones that involve ennobling the character, transforming negative traits to positive ones, combating weaknesses, bringing dis-harmonies back into balance, attaining good health, activating and developing latent potential and abilities, transforming bad habits, and so on. Wishes that have nothing to do with one’s personality, that involve others to fulfill, those which are designed for acquiring material possessions, or producing group events, can’t be realized. The higher soul, which is the creative aspect that governs only itself in the lower regions of the material plane only goal and true ability, is to “create itself”, and as a result create its experience of reality. As we change, others and the world around us changes accordingly through our perception of them.

Process as a Practice:

  • Decide what you want to transform about yourself, and what it is you want to create in its place.
  • State it in positive terms as “what you want”, and not as what you don’t want.
  • Structure the phrase as a command, directive, or order that’s “authoritative and firm”, much like a parent, yet friendly and compassionate.
  • State it in present tense as if it’s already real and happening – “I am feeling better and better every day”, “I am healthy”, “I am confident and self-assured”, “I am a non-smoker”, and so on.
  • As you say it to yourself, form it in your imagination as if it’s already real and true as an “experience” of it.
  • Enhance and intensify it in sensory terms – what are you seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, smelling, and telling yourself about it?
  • Create it in a way that invokes positive emotions in response to it that are very compelling in nature.
  • Repeat your affirmation at least 40 times each time you practice while counting with beads or knots so you won’t be distracted by having to think about it.
  • Practice at least twice a day, preferably before going to sleep and immediately after waking up.
  • Practice the same affirmation repeatedly for 40 days.
  • Only work on one affirmation at a time and stay with it until it’s achieved in a satisfactory manner before moving on to the next one.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

Integrative Mind-Body Health Consultant and Spiritual Mentor

The Nature of Projection, Judgment, and Emotional Reactions

The idea that whatever we see in others and have a strong reaction to is something that we also have in us, can be difficult to understand because of course we don’t see ourselves as being anything like them and may even despise them for being that way. We’re not relating to them, agreeing with them, and don’t have any memory whatsoever of being that way ourselves. Many of the behaviors we react to and judge harshly are the same type of dynamics we grew up with or were subject to at various points in our life, and we actually fashioned ourselves by way of them to be the opposite. We put forth a conscious effort to make sure we were nothing like them and made sure we never behaved that way. So to contemplate the idea that we share the same traits can be confusing in the most basic sense and something that we refute through a form of “knowing ourselves”. Yet this idea comes from the fact that we actually have both a conscious and unconscious “self”, both of which are being projected all the time to make up our perception of others and our environment, and through an understanding of how we are always acting “on ourselves” to “create ourselves”.

Our soul is comprised of both a conscious and unconscious mind, and we are always acting to create ourselves through both aspects of our mind, though we are only fully aware of the conscious aspects which are the ones that we willing choose, give expression to and use to form experiences of ourselves. As we create experiences of ourselves, we accumulate memories of “being that way”, and we begin building an image of ourselves out of only the aspects we’re aware of. This conscious self-image, referred to as the “ego”, or more accurately the “false ego”, is the image that we use as the means of sensing ourselves as a certain type of person based on what we know and accept about ourselves and what attributes, qualities, and traits we accept and freely express “as” our personality and basic ways of being. This idea we create about ourselves is a “false” idea because it’s based only partial information and aspects of ourselves and doesn’t incorporate aspects that we have while refusing to express them.

There are two basic ways that we are always in the process of creating ourselves. We are either creating ourselves to be “like” others, or the “opposite” of others. As we encounter and experience and individual, activity, or idea, we enter into relationship with it and compare, contrast, and relate to it as the means of sensing ourselves by way of it. Energetically, we’re constantly being influenced and stimulated by others and our environment. Whatever qualities are being outwardly expressed in any situation, stimulate those same qualities “in us”, awakening and calling them forth into an active state. All energy has both dominant and passive aspects as inherent parts of it. As we’re being stimulated by something or someone, we realize it, sense ourselves through and “as” that quality of being, and we judge and evaluate it accordingly. If our judgment is favorable, and expressing it “matches” or is congruent with our idea about ourselves, we embrace it, allow it and freely express it, shaping ourselves by way of it to be “like it”. If however our judgment is harsh and negative, and doesn’t comply with what we accustomed to expressing, then we refuse to express it, deny to ourselves that we “have it” (the feeling, tendency, or behavior), and we repress it instead. As we deny feelings that are an active part of our psychological makeup, because we deem them bad or wrong somehow, they remain active in us and we continue projecting them outwardly, just as we do our conscious self-aware aspects, and they become an inherent part of others and our environment.

       As a quality and feeling is activated in us by some kind of stimulus, brought forth into our awareness where we “sense ourselves” as being like that and we judge it to be bad or wrong somehow, and as a result can’t find an appropriate means to express it because the situation that’s acting to stimulate it is also being judged as inappropriate, and so we refuse to, we simultaneously choose how to be instead and in what way we’re going to express ourselves in contrast to it. We develop ourselves to somehow be the opposite of it by what we actively choose instead. This “division of the self”, produced by a form of judgment births contrasting aspects of ourselves as our “shadow” or “hidden aspects” and our “ego” as our accepted and freely expressed aspects. The ego and the shadow are adversaries and mortal enemies, because the dissolution of the shadow through self-awareness and active expression means the “death of the ego” in terms of transformation.

As we “judge” ourselves based on active qualities in us, which are what cause us to refuse and deny them, we then project those same qualities onto others, and as we “see those qualities” in them, we judge them just as harshly, and through the experience it brings us, we shape ourselves once again to somehow be the “opposite of them”. If we deem someone to be an idiot or asshole, we simultaneously produce an opposing image of ourselves as being wise, profound, and kind in contrast to them. If we see someone as being arrogant, selfish, or manipulative, we immediately produce a sense of ourselves as being whatever we consider the opposite to be. In this way, we are literally dependent on them as the means of creating ourselves to be their opposition. We first judge ourselves for having those same feelings, desires, impulses, and traits, which are universal in nature and a part of all humanity, causing us to repress and forget about them, yet we still have a pronounced “reaction to them” in others and all around us.

The act of “judging” or discriminating is a natural part of the minds ability to reason, choose and willfully act out choices as the means of creating itself through its experiences. Most of what we refer to as being “judgmental” or as “judging others” is due to an incorrect use of judgment that’s a form of “value judgment”. The criteria that we use for judging ourselves is usually taught to us as a part of our conditioning through the group mind or mass consciousness, and is one of the most basic ways they or it plants the seeds that we use throughout our life to create ourselves and others to “conform” to the general consensus. We’re “taught” what good and bad are as values and beliefs of some kind, and we use this first to create ourselves initially, and then continue to create ourselves by way of it in relationship with everyone and everything else. It’s one of the most primary forms of mind control and brainwashing that’s conducted for the most part in a completely unconscious and automatic manner.

       It’s easy to realize that we only have strong emotional reactions to some people, ideas, and activities, while others we relate to, acknowledge as being good and right and feel at one with. All reaction comes from encountering outside of us what’s the complementary opposite of what’s inside of us. If it’s the same we barely notice it, it blends congruently with our experiences, and we don’t challenge it in any way. When it opposes us (or our self-made image of ourselves), it elicits an immediate and often intense emotional charge, and our thoughts about it that create how we experience it are highly judgmental in the sense of seeing them as bad, repulsive, and despicable somehow. As we judge them, it reinforces our judgment of ourselves, and we repress that idea even further, while still creating ourselves by way of it, as its opposition.

All ideas of a moral nature have a very strong emotional component connected to them, just as all actual memories of any kind are formed into memories because of the strong emotions being experienced at the time they were created. An idea or actual memory is activated in us through an emotional charge that’s transmitted from one person to the other, or that we produce inside of us through our natural reaction to it. Our thoughts about things produce our own emotional reaction, and emotions being transmitted by others and received by us control our thoughts through the memories they elicit. All value judgments (right and wrong) have a strong emotional component to them that not only arouse us and drive our thoughts in a compulsive way, but are also the foundation out of which we created ourselves. So to “give up” our judgments, is to transform our ego and our “sense of self”, requiring us to acknowledge and bring into awareness aspects of ourselves that we’ve never outwardly expressed before. When this happens, we don’t know how to be and can feel torn with deep feelings of insecurity and the lingering residue of harsh judgments that we’ve used to shape every aspect of ourselves and our life.

In the same manner, we form what we can call actual and objective judgments that are a form of accurate evaluation using “good judgment” and discretion that we have no problem not expressing because it’s honestly not “in us” to be that way. As we come across ideas through an experience of some kind, we’re always defining ourselves through contemplating them, trying them on, running scenarios of what they’d be like if we played them out as a reality, then, sensing ourselves in that situation as a way of realizing what’s actually in us as a part of our character and what’s not. We don’t necessarily judge them as right or wrong, but simply not who we are and not the reality we want to produce and play a part in. For example, sexual promiscuity or adultery may be an idea that’s playing out around us or is a part of our immediate environment, which, as we view it in terms of the reality and what it means about us as a result, what it would cause in other areas of our life, we may realize without doubt that there’s no part of us that’s like that. We’re not inclined to engage in those types of activities. Though we may find ourselves sexually attracted to others occasionally and the opportunities arise in which we could easily participate, or we feel “tempted” somehow, when thinking about the reality of it and how we’d feel being in it doing it, we realize we don’t want it, and so we decide not to. This is different than deciding not to because we feel like it would make us out to be a liar, cheat, deceptive, raunchy and bad person as what forms our decision not to. It’s all about what our “reason is” for making the decision.

       To encounter and become aware of our shadow, embracing it instead of denying it, brings us face to face with who we really are and why we became the way we did. If we admit to ourselves having a feeling and desire towards something that we judge harshly as being bad and wrong to do, and that we also have those same urges and impulses sometimes, it can cause us to go into a bit of an identity crisis. If we realize however that all qualities and traits have their appropriate expression under the right circumstances, and we realize that part of our judgment came from the situation or activity implied by them through association that was inappropriate for expressing that idea, and we look instead for how we could express it in a way that would enhance our current experience and expand our ego’s ability to create unique and diverse experiences of ourselves, we can find the means of expression that will create in a productive and conscious manner while bringing us some level of gratification and satisfaction. Even what seems like the worse traits and activity can be exactly what’s called for under the right circumstances and within the appropriate situation, and as a result, will be the best and most appropriate response.

While most believe that the shadow is comprised of our “worst traits” or ones that are easily seen as bad, the fact is it’s comprised of any trait that we deem bad, wrong, weak, or that would somehow mean something bad about us if we were that way. For example, if someone has been led to believe that being “nice” is a form of weakness, perhaps because they were taken advantage of by someone whenever they were nice, they judge themselves as being weak for being that way, and will refuse to be that way and choose to act mean, harsh, or uncaring instead, perceiving that to mean that they’re strong and in control. Someone who’s very compassionate and caring may have ended up feeling like a doormat or as though they’re always being manipulated by those only looking to take, and will consider it a bad trait to openly express, and will become hardened in whatever way they feel they need to in order to suppress that tendency. So judgment isn’t just in regards to what could clearly be seen as a destructive way of being, but it’s formed by whatever we used as the means of creating ourselves by how we interpreted it and experienced it through our formative conditioning. Some people who are in reality exceedingly gentle and kind can put on the appearance of being rude, obtrusive, or tough, and ridicule those who are gentle and kind, as a means of protecting and shielding themselves from what they have experienced as being very negative consequences to being the way they “really are”.

Once we realize what’s really happening whenever we are reacting and judging someone, and we choose instead to refrain from acting and turn inwards to see what it is in us that feels such a strong need to judge them, what is the reaction about, and we let a free-flow association of ideas take place where we recall memories that were of a similar nature, and times in our life when we had the same feelings and inclinations towards being that way, we can begin realizing a part of our nature that we convinced ourselves we didn’t have and as a result, forgot about having. We can come to realize that as children in our formative years we didn’t have the ability to reason, judge and choose for ourselves, and so we we’re told how to judge people and in what way to judge them. We we’re taught to be judgmental based on someone else’s opinions, values and beliefs, and criteria for using to shape ourselves and everyone else to be the same way.

As children we don’t know who we are and we begin creating ourselves by default through the ideas and opinions of others that we’re taught and come to accept as our own. Once our “core beliefs” are established and our paradigm precisely structured, we continue creating out of it unconsciously, often throughout our lifetime, and as a result, create a false image in place of who we really are as an individual. We only break away from the group mind of the collective unconscious and begin truly creating ourselves by way of our own capacities when we begin gaining self-realization of our dual nature and we take the necessary action to integrate opposing aspects into a “whole being” that’s unified and coherent in all that we do. Through true self-awareness we can begin fashioning ourselves to be the unique individuals we are. We can break away from the mind training of the masses and become a self-referencing source of creative power.

Projection and Judgment as the Tools for Self-Realization

Once we realize what’s really going on anytime we have an adverse reaction to someone or something where we’re judging them according to our own criterion and value system, we can see it as the tool it really is. All unknown content of our subconscious mind is constantly being projected and makes up a substantial part of our outer awareness. Anything we’re “reacting to” is because we have the same quality, trait, and tendency in us that we judged just as harshly as we’re judging them. We were conditioned somehow to the same dynamic as an interactive pattern where we took on the opposing role. All reactions form the basis for self-creation through the nature of the reaction and what we tell ourselves about them while contrasting and opposing them and shaping ourselves to be the opposite. We’re always shaping ourselves to either be just like others, or the exact opposite of them. But either way, we are dependent on the active expression of our shared traits as the basis for creating ourselves no matter what role we play in acting it out together.

Because our perception of the outer environment is formed from the mental paradigm of the inner environment as a projection, we can come to realize hidden aspects of ourselves and the nature of our conditioning and why we believe what we do, and how we’re always using that to tell a story about things that shapes us simultaneously by way of playing different roles in the same story. We can realize that anytime we’re reacting and judging that we’re looking in a mirror and seeing the reverse image of the same thing. We can turn inwards, and through introspection, begin realizing our connection to the same idea and how it was that we formed our judgments that caused us to deny expressing certain parts of ourselves. We can gain insight into our early conditioning and how we were trained to the mindset that we used to create ourselves and others out of. As adults reviewing a process that was formed and set into motion as a child, we can reevaluate the same ideas with a renewed sense of clarity and see how they can be incorporated into our “known self” as the means to expand, enhance, and invigorate or ego, rather than shattering it.

All transformation comes by way of incorporating new aspects into an existing model. By blending with and taking on new and diverse qualities, we can grow ourselves in new ways and expand our range of self-expression and what’s possible, creating a new array of novel experiences. We can learn and experiment with new ways of being. We can try on new ideas to see how we feel, and decide whether or not we want to continue into it, change and alter it somehow, or ignore it in favor of something else. We can come to know what’s truly “in us as us” and what has simply been taught and acquired along the way that we accepted in place of our true self. We can begin using our true ability to intuitively reason, decide and willfully act out our decisions as the means of true independent self-creation. As we come across traits that we definitely have that we associate with very distinct ideas that we honestly can’t see ourselves doing, we can ask ourselves how we can we express this same quality in another way that will be congruent with everything else and produce a desired overall result. We can begin challenging ourselves and developing our creative abilities to self-actualize in new ways. We can break patterns and conventional mindsets in favor of individuality and freedom of self-expression because we realize that as adults we have the discretion and reasoning powers to become self-directed and therefore self-determined.

Dr. Linda Gadbois 

The Art of Self-Creation and the Power of an “Ideal”

In order to “create” something in a deliberate and intentional manner, we have to start by formulating an idea of what it is we’re creating and why. As with any creative process, we have to start with an idea as an “ideal” of what we’re aspiring towards that moves us from a current condition or character, to a more desired one, that requires us to “transform” it. We have to create a firm idea of what we’re “acting on ourselves” to create. So in recognizing an undesirable trait or tendency, one that we don’t like and want to change, we have to simultaneously formulate in our mind the trait we want to replace it with. We have to form a clear idea of where, how, and who we are now, in our present state, and also where, who, and how we’ll be in our desired state. In this way, we take a common idea of ourselves and we evolve it into a higher state as a perfected and fully developed idea.

Many people have been taught to take a negative attitude towards the idea of “perfection”, usually interpreting it to mean someone else’s idea for us, or some kind of standard set by others or society in an attempt to make us “feel as if we’re never enough” and keeping us always trying to become what others (people, organizations, society) want us to be in order to fit in and conform, while of course, never really “measuring up”. But perfection in its positive use is a standard we create for ourselves, and use to hold ourselves to as a means of developing ourselves in very direct ways. To become the person we aspire to be, which only comes by way of our own will and the inherent ability to be self-determined through various means of self-discipline and devotion to a higher level of consciousness, obtainable only by way of our own hand. In order to grow and develop ourselves into a higher and more mature state, we have to form an idea of what that state is, and what current beliefs, attitudes, traits, tendencies, habits, behaviors, etc., prevent it or act to contradict it and therefore prevent it.

We then have to form an idea of how those traits need to be transformed by employing complementary and opposite traits in their stay. All transformation, which is really a process of equilibrating forces that are active in our life, is undertaken through an understanding of sympathy and antipathy. By realizing and deciding which characteristics we’re currently employing that prevent us from becoming who we desire to be and know, because of this innate desire, we can employ the lawful process for changing it in a conscious and deliberate way. So knowing this, we have to learn how to undergo a creative process of any kind by first employing a detailed idea of what we’re actually creating, as well as what aspects we’ll transform as a means of creating it. Then we can use each end of the equation to evaluate our progress from one idea to another.

        An ideal is where we take a basic idea and we develop it to be the best it can be in all aspects that are involved in composing it, so that it requires activation and use of our highest potential in order to achieve. It can also come as a process of removing activity from a potential currently being expressed, and bringing latent, unused potential into being by embodying it, making it active in us, then using it in our life to create experiences of a new and different nature. But either way, what we’re talking about as a form of basic growth and development is a process of transformation from what is to what will be, as an evolutionary process that we initiate and undertake by way of will, imagination, and action. Anything that’s created in an intentional manner has to first be imagined. We’re only truly capable of doing what we can first imagine ourselves doing. By imagining it first as an experience of it, by way of the reality of it, we produce the means for actually acting it out and “becoming it” as a result.

So all self-creation is a form of transformation because we’re always starting with or working out of our “self” as already created, to continue the creative process of intentionally becoming. How we are created initially takes place as a natural, predominately unconscious process of formative conditioning, that’s sets the basis for what’s referred to as our “second birth” or “spiritual awakening”, where we pick up the unconscious process of self-creation, and produce it, undertake it with a sense of awareness where we deliberately shape ourselves through the conscious engagement of unconscious processes. This process of transformation from an unconscious state to one of self-awareness, where we realize how we’ve been shaped through various processes up to this point, we can work by way of the same processes while maintaining full awareness and exercising various forms of discipline to control what was previously operating as unconscious tendencies and employing conscious ones in their place.

Any idea that’s not turned into an “ideal”, requiring you to aspire towards it, kills the life-force within you as your creative will, while every idea that’s made into an ideal as the highest possibility for that idea, requires conscious use of your life-force and willpower in order to create it. In order to grow and develop ourselves in new ways, we have to awaken and make active what was up to this point latent within us as unused potential. If we choose not to, and simply keep living out of our “conditioned self”, created in a haphazard way by others through a form of default due to our upbringing, then these forces as latent potential remain dormant and eventually become inaccessible because our identity becomes so habituated and fixed, that we can’t imagine ourselves being any other way, or we become so identified with our stories as a way of being, that we can’t (don’t want to) let go of them, because we won’t “know who we are” without them. At this point in our life, usually mid-life, change at the most fundamental level becomes an identity crisis that can throw us into a tail-spin that we never fully recover from.

       To develop ourselves through our spiritual consciousness, is to return our “fixed mindset” to a fluid creative state where we’re always in the process of becoming by systematically employing new perspectives and new behaviors that cultivate new aspects within us, making us fluent, lean, and flexible, and able to readily adapt to new situations by employing the behaviors most appropriate for creating in that situation as a primary means of personal growth that increases our capacity for expression and maximizes our full potential.

So when becoming conscious and self-aware of your own life, and commanding your creative abilities to self-create, you must start by creating an ideal of yourself as perfected or as your “highest possibility” for utilizing your full potential. This ideal becomes a vision for your life as an image of yourself in terms of how you sense yourself and the identity you form by way of it. To create standards as a form of “moral code” that you hold yourself to without compromising, is the key to higher, intentional development that prevents you from cowering or changing your mind mid-stream when maintaining the new standard is inconvenient or hard to do.

Once this ideal of yourself is firmly formed in your mind it provides a template for designing a strategy for implementing and creating it. This strategy needs to be broken down into a step-by-step process of logical progression that’s implemented gradually and consistently in stages and by working with single aspects at a time that make up the whole, and setting a time-frame for accomplishing one before moving onto another. The accomplishment of one transformed trait lays the foundation necessary for the next as a synchronistic flow as growth that lays the foundation of an accumulative, building process.

       Change that takes place gradually, is readily integrated and synthesized into your mental paradigm, and can be attained without an arduous struggle or heavy sense of suffering, which always accompanies change of our fundamental habits or ways of being. Because of a new awareness of what we previously engaged in without awareness acts to amplify or increase the feelings involved, or the forces at work that served to motivate and maintain the behavior, giving us a heightened sense around them, that also gives us a stronger sense of struggling to exercise direct control over them by abstaining or refraining, while simultaneously replacing them with new behaviors that take a while to grow accustomed to and fail to satisfy the reasons we had for producing and maintaining the old behavior now being transformed.  A new behavior has to be implemented willfully for a period of time, roughly forty days or six weeks, before it becomes natural, build into the muscle, and we begin doing it in an automatic fashion.

Once it (the new behavior) becomes natural and easy to maintain, we’re ready to implement another step. We should not do more than one at a time, because concentrated thought is the key to manifesting physical realities as the expression of an idea, and we want to avoid creating a feeling of suffering, or missing and longing for what we’re giving up. One of the most notorious ways we sabotage ourselves right from the beginning, is by attempting to much change all at once, which makes it overwhelming and creates a feeling of constant struggle and suffering that makes the change seem ungratifying or somehow worse than the previous state.

Change undertaken gradually allows for constant modifications to our paradigm, which then acts to naturally produce and maintain the change as a part of our normal consciousness. Trying to change too much to fast doesn’t establish the paradigm necessary to naturally produce and maintain as a natural and automatic function the new way of being. Once a paradigm shift takes place through the integration of the small change, it’s modified to be able to support continued change as a growth process that actually becomes the same as the change. The change also describes, expresses and defines the paradigm as being of the same nature and thereby producing the same experience as a reality, actualization, and outer perception of the change.

       This transformative process operates according to law and is the case whether we’re talking about a person, relationship, situation, or business. Change that’s gradual is easily incorporated and goes unnoticed. It’s readily adapted and adjusted to as a form of equalization that reinstates harmony within the system, setting the foundation necessary for the next step of a larger process to be implemented, again, allowing for it to be incorporated and act to make a slight modification as a synchronized movement that acts naturally to adjust the whole system to support it. If change is introduced without allowing time for adjustment and modification as a new function requiring the whole system, then as soon as it hits a point where it’s not supported, the system “acts on it” (the change) to transform it according to the system, back into its original behavior.

All natural processes are produced by our paradigm and our capacity to create in a way that’s consistent and thoroughly maintained, which only comes by way of our paradigm. All “permanent change” requires modification and reformation of our mental paradigm. Without it, at some point, we relapse and fall back into the old behavior and way of doing things. All change should be designed by us, because it’s only us that have the true ability to act on ourselves to create ourselves. All change needs to work in harmony with natural tendencies already inherent in us or our system, in a harmonious manner of cooperation, by simply employing those same tendencies in a new manner and by way of new means. Change that goes against our nature and contradicts our values and beliefs, can’t actually be produced by us in a natural fashion, nor maintained for any extended period of time. So the “ideal” created as a “model” for self-creating, should always comply and be harmonious with our values and beliefs, or we should start by addressing our values and beliefs by examining them thoroughly, identifying where the contradiction takes place, then adjust all aspects until they are congruent with one another, and interact in a harmonious fashion to produce the same experience of reality.

        We also have to notice what emotions play out in any situation and act to control not only our thought process, but also our automatic behaviors. If we have strong emotions that contradict and undermine what we’re attempting to implement, then the emotions tend to win out by sabotaging all conscious efforts. We have to instead identify our own emotional reactions to certain ideas, gaining awareness around them, and then forming new associations to our desired change, removing triggers around them that activate negative emotions in response to them, while intentionally associating positive emotions to our desired change. Making the idea compelling by infusing it with positive emotions and associations is crucial for producing change out of a strong desire for it while associating very positive and gratifying ideas or experiences with it. This also acts to create how we experience the change, which is the same feeling we infuse the reality of the change with, which its accomplishment or attainment will simply act to give us more of that same feeling.

The change desired should always be undertaken with a sense of enthusiasm and form of excitement that forms a kind of joy and contentment around it. In this way, once the change is established as our reality, it gives us more of that same feeling. If we pursue something from an experience of stress, worry, or feeling overwhelmed, attaining it simply keeps the feeling going through the attempt to maintain it. We have to not only serve to “create it”, but also act naturally and without thought or effort to “maintain it”.

The feeling we form around an idea, shapes how we experience that idea as a personal reality. So it’s important to gain awareness around the reason for the change. What the change will give us, allow, how we’ll benefit from it, and what will it allow us to do that we currently can’t, and so on. So if we decide, for example, to transform fear of some kind into courage, we have to identify how we’ll benefit from that and what it will produce in our life as a result. We have to cultivate the idea of courage in a way that makes us fall in love with ourselves for being that way. We have to focus all of our attention away from what made us feel afraid and onto how we’ll benefit by creating the experience of courage and what it’ll bring into our life as a result. We have to actively and intentionally choose courage in place of fear, and act it out in order to change our experience of ourselves and reality as a result.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

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How the Mind Creates Reality – The Nature of Perception and Experience

There has been so much confusion with the explosion of quantum physics and Mind Sciences as to the true nature of what we call “reality”.  One of the most fundamental problems we have is people tend to think of the material world of matter and form as a fixed, objective, and stationary construct where every person (mind) is somehow perceiving and experiencing the “same thing”. Because of this, we don’t realize the true power of our mind to shape reality, or the true nature of the relationship between the mind and matter. Naturally, the entire material world is only “perceivable” through or because of the mind, and the mind as a field of information is what “operates” both the brain and the body, which is a mechanism for processing sensory information to produce what we experience as coherent and consistent version of reality.

When we say that the “mind creates its own reality”, we’re usually not referring to the idea that it literally manifests the physical world that appears to be outside of us as well as in us, although there’s certainly an argument for this idea also, but what it means in the general sense is that the mind “interacts” with matter energetically, and through resonance and sympathetic induction, alters it’s outward appearance and how it “organizes” in terms of attributes, qualities, and characteristics, producing a variation that still indigenous to the same overall theme as a new version or possibility. All vibration acts to form a pattern as the electromagnetic field that organizes matter into a distinct form that’s then animated with a form of personality where it outwardly displays distinct qualities and characteristics. The pattern inherent in a frequency is more of a “theme” or general “range of expression” rather than a distinct and fixed shape that exists more as a specific vibration within that frequency.

As we vibrate to a certain frequency, we act to connect with that same frequency in everything else through “sympathetic induction”. This is where the subtle energy that’s vibrating and shaping one form, literally “enters into” another form vibrating at the same frequency or within near proximity (where it can still be drawn in), and “affects it” by “altering its state”. The two aspects of the same frequency then begin vibrating in harmony, forming into the same “type of pattern” as a cohesive and coherent idea. All of what we call a frequency, which is a range of vibration as a kind of scale that moves between extremes of the same overall idea or theme, exists within other frequencies that together make up what we think of as the natural world as an ecosystem. All of what we call “material form” is actually composed of mostly empty space as “natural forces” that charge particles and organize them into patterns as a “living system”. Energy from all around readily move into and through the empty space holding matter together, influencing it in a way that alters how it organizes the system in terms of what’s made active and inactive, and how it changes in its “appearance” while still maintaining the same overall thematic or archetypal shape. So we don’t necessarily change the outer shape of things, but rather which attributes and qualities are active, called forth expressing, and which ones become latent and recede, and how it behaves and expresses in relationship to us as a result.

        In the Biblical story of the creation of the natural world, called the “original creation”, the material world was formed from the “spoken word”, but left unfinished. Humans, who are gifted with higher capacities of the mind for creating, were left with the task of “finishing it” by creating it in a unique and individual fashion. While the material world and the lower mind of our animal body appears to exist in what we could call an objective, stationary and neutral state, where everybody is seeing the same “basic thing”, it actually exists as a wave or “field of information” that has an infinite amount of potential that’s all thematic in nature as archetypes of various sorts, where every single mind that enters into relationship with it, filters out certain aspects, while selecting and enhancing others, forming it into a new and unique variation. While a tree exists as the same type of tree to everyone who views it, how they “experience” that tree, will be different every time. No two people experience the same thing in the same way. It’s always different based on how their mind forms it by resonating with it.

All energy as vibration contains an archetypal pattern as a field of information that forms an archetypal theme that has an infinite amount of possibilities for creating based on how the information is sorted, recomposed into new formula’s that produce new variations of the same thing. All material form exists as both a particle and a wave. Every object is accompanied by a subtle field of energy as the consciousness that organizes it through a “self-organizing mechanism” that “in-forms” it, holds it together as an operating system, and animates it with life. It’s the “empty space” that organizes the particles into a working system of some sort. These natural forces as electromagnetic fields have no real physical properties, and so the “mind” as individual consciousness moves freely into the mind and subtle energy of everything else, influencing it to a new vibration that alters how it appears to that mind. We are always creating (or recreating) everything to be in our image and of our likeness.

So we’re not necessarily literally creating our own reality, but rather transforming the existing reality that we all share as a part of this dimension, into a new and unique variation through our very perception of it. Our mind vibrates to a certain frequency that has a thematic pattern inherent in it that forms the energetic structure of our mind as a mental paradigm. This paradigm acts as a holographic model that resonates with everything around it, shape-shifting it to be of a congruent nature as a way of creating a consistent experience of reality in an ongoing fashion. We can only perceive, conceive of, or comprehend in our outer world what matches our inner world as the thematic structure of our mind. If it doesn’t match it or it exists outside of our paradigm (frequency), then we literally “can’t see it”. We can look straight at it and not comprehend it. We can only comprehend and therefore experience what we can blend with energetically, become one with in kind, and influence to be of the same idea as we are. All reality in this sense is a matter of perception.

       As we “perceive something”, meaning we form an experience of it, comes by way of our ability to influence it into a new variation of itself that’s a correspondence to our model of the world. So as we’re perceiving and thereby experiencing the outer world, we’re constantly in the process of reforming it to be like us, of the same thematic structure as we are. Perception operates according to the same principles that govern DNA and all physical manifestation. You have a field of information as the potential for producing a form, and based on what’s “turn on” and made active, and what’s “turned off” and made latent, determines the nature of the form. As we resonate with something, our field of information as our mind vibrating at a specific frequency with a thematic pattern, enters into the energy field of the form we’re interacting with, forming an “interference pattern” out of “shared components and qualities”, where what’s of a like nature is amplified and embellished, and what’s not is canceled out and diminished, and we “alter the pattern” that’s producing the form changing how it appears outwardly. It literally changes appearance or shape-shifts by conforming to our mental paradigm and ideas about it. While the overall thematic form remains the same, the active components as attributes and qualities are reformulated to where what’s actively expressing changes not only how it looks, but also how it behaves. As we reformulate the basic nature of something through our energetic interaction, we change how it’s being and what it’s doing.  This is very easy to see and understand by how we can “change” how people see themselves and behave through how we treat them and how they treat us.

All perception is formed through what we call a “filtering system”, usually comprised of values, beliefs, preferences, tendencies, memories, temperament, and so on, that together form a dynamic model that acts to reorganize any situation or reality by abstracting some parts while eliminating others. We’re not only always working on a limited amount of information gathered through a form of natural selection, but we then organize that small amount of information into the idea that we want it to be, believe it is, or expect it to be. What we believe to be true forms our experiences. What we value in a situation forms our process of selection. We reshape anything in whatever way we need to in order to form the interpretation we want it to have. How we interpret things to give them meaning, shapes how we experience them by the story we form in our mind about them. As we walk into any situation, we are programmed with a natural selection process for what we notice and abstract and we don’t and ignore.

This is very easy to see and understand when we simply realize that five people who are a part of the same event or reality will “experience” that event in a unique and different way from all the others, often telling such diverse stories about it that you can’t even tell it was the same event. Ask them about it and you’ll get five completely different accounts about what happened, what it meant, what resulted from it, what went on, what others were doing, what was important about it, what they took away from it, and so on. So even though we all share a common reality, how we experience that reality is very unique and diverse for each one of us. No two people experience the same thing in the same way. No two people look at the same idea the same way, we all have a unique take on it based on how we’re filtering it through our mental paradigm as our vibratory frequency to reorganize the general information involved and available to everyone into a unique pattern.

       Quantum physics has demonstrated that matter is influenced by the mind of the person interacting with it. That whatever the intention is for an experiment, whatever it’s meant to prove or disapprove, influences and determines how matter “shows up and behaves”. The consciousness of the individual enters into matter, influencing it with its thoughts about it, and stimulates it into new forms with new properties and behaviors. The individual viewing an event, and the event itself as it appears to the viewer, are a part of the “same thing”. The mind literally produces the results it wants to or has an intention and expectation for. This is why several different quantum physicists (or scientists of any kind) all conducting similar experiments will come to different conclusions. Where the only way to really know if something is real or not, is if two or more people “appear to be seeing” the same thing. And even when they do appear to be seeing the same thing, it’ll vary to some degree based on the paradigm of each individual which is what’s forming their perception, interpretation and experience of it.

Understanding the true relationship between mind and matter allows us to understand the true nature of Alchemy where we realize that the only way to change how the outer world appears to us, is by changing ourselves. If it still appears the same, it’s because nothing has actually changed in terms of our paradigm or mental and emotional state. Likewise, we can’t really change others in the direct sense of the idea, but by changing ourselves, we change how they appear to us and how they affect us. It’s only by changing our thoughts that we change our reality as a correspondence. The way to tell when you’re truly growing, developing new aspects of yourself, and transforming by altering your vibration, is due to the fact that you start looking at things differently, seeing something different in the same thing, and the way the outer world and others appear to you starts changing accordingly. As long as we hold the same frequency based on the same beliefs, values, preferences, memories, and thematic life story, the outer world appears stagnate and methodical. Nothing changes. By changing our mind, we change ourselves and how we perceive (create) others and our life. So in this way, we are definitely the one producing our perception and experience of reality. All of life as we are capable of knowing it is a personal creation of a common theme.

Dr. Linda Gadbois       

Integrative Mind-Body Health Consultant and Spiritual Mentor

 

Energetic Imprinting, Conditioning, and Dynamics – Liberating your Soul from the Unconscious Tendencies that Bind You

Our soul is comprised of essence as memory that comes from the relationship it forms with the body, which resides in a predominately unconscious state, and how they work together to create experiences of reality. The subconscious mind of the body also runs off of memory which it uses to form repetitive and habitual patterns that produce a consistent and congruent version of reality. What we call “reality” is produced as both an inner imagining and the outer complementary correspondence of what’s imagined internally. The subconscious is passive and receptive in nature, meaning it has no will or ability to discriminate and make decisions of its own based on reasoning, and simply takes in ideas from the active, willful mind as suggestions that it forms into thoughts as a sensory reality in the faculty of the imagination, which is where all reality as an outer projection is born and fabricated out of essence (astral light or photons).

The soul bonds to the body through the memory inherent in its DNA, which is of a similar and compatible nature, capable of providing the soul with the corresponding reality of its memories so it can continue fashioning itself by way of the experiences the reality provides. The memory, as the essence of the soul resonates with the ancestral memory of the body, and enters into it as an active force that animates and structures it, giving it life as the ideal home or material vehicle for the soul. All levels of consciousness exist on a hierarchical plane, where the lower is always subordinate (passive) to the higher one (active), and provides the form or shell for the higher force to inhabit, bringing it into an active state of expression and creation within the material realm. This hierarchy of consciousness exists as spherical fields nested within greater and smaller fields, all of which vibrate within the same frequency as a range of vibration and lend themselves to the creation of the same type of nature and level of reality.

This level of consciousness that acts to naturally produce and actively play a role in a common (shared) reality forms a whole or singular dimension that’s structured by a dynamic interweaving of an infinite number of vibrations, all with a common core of information that act as their building blocks. All reality in this sense exists within an even greater reality as a unified dimension, where unique formulas of common elements are shaped by the individual mind to form an original version as a variation or possibility. The archetypal world of pure consciousness exists as archetypes in their potential state as what we might call generic templates. Archetypes manifest by undergoing a process of adaptation and reformulation that modify and reshape them into a new form that’s still indigenous to the greater, shared reality in which they’re birthed, maintained, and used to express at the individual level of self-creation.

        As the soul resonates and bonds with the body, forming coherence as a harmonious vibration that creates in a spontaneous manner, it acts first to reform and establish the psychological patterns of its memory as a predisposition, temperament, general attitude, and tendencies that make up its personality, then those same patterns as dynamics are played out through its conditioning, because the memories of the parents are of the same nature and dynamics of the soul, as a form of “group memory” (soul groups). As these dynamics continue to play out and we have a role in them, we’re further trained and conditioned to those dynamics as behavioral patterns that have a theme as a story-line inherent in them.

In an attempt to make sense of the events of our life and the dynamics that we’re actively a part of creating, we begin telling ourselves a story about them. This story makes them mean something, and it’s the meaning as a story-line that we become imprinted with as a dominate and habitual tendency. This means we readily perceive it and participate in it in an unconscious manner without any direct awareness or realization of what we’re doing and why. We don’t realize that all of our experiences are subjective in nature, meaning we’re the ones that are creating them by how we interpret events of our life to give them meaning, and so we imagine that life is happening “to us” in an objective manner and we have no control or say so about it. Yet, though we can’t control the events of our life (necessarily), we absolutely have full control over how we choose to experience them.

What we call reality comes as a cohesive series of events that take place outside of and around us, and how we “experience” those events, while they may seem like two separate ideas, are in fact correlated correspondences of each other. The outer, objective, abstract, and neutral reality that’s common to all of us as a form of shared or mass consciousness provides the stage and the means for organizing it in such a way that we experience it in a consistent manner through the story we’re always in the process of telling ourselves about it. This story as an interpretation makes it into a personalized version of reality as our own creation that we’re then subject to (it determines us).

        We reshape our outer reality based on personal feelings, tastes, and beliefs. We view it through the paradigm of our mind (soul memory) and we reformulate it through our emotional state to match it. We reshape it to be of the same nature as we are where it lends itself in a complementary manner to naturally tell our story about it. As we create our experiences of things, we simultaneously get a sense of ourselves through those experiences, identifying with our own creation, and shaping ourselves through the memory it provides that becomes a part of both the subconscious mind of the body and our soul’s essence. We’re constantly forming and in-forming ourselves through the experience of our own creation, by taking what exists as a “universal idea” and using it as a thematic template for creating a “personal version”.

Our formative conditioned patterns are established through the “theme” as a life dynamic that’s being played out all around us that we play a role in and are an inherent part of. While we play a certain role in a greater dynamic as a child, we are in fact “imprinted” (unconsciously programmed) with the “whole dynamic” and every role that’s required in order to act it out. Whatever role we’re not actively playing in the dynamic is being demonstrated for us by others, and we actively engage in it through our relationship with the greater whole and our constant interaction and participation in it. These dynamics are created in several areas of our life at the same time, based on the same general theme being played out in different ways through different types of relationships. How we’re treated as a child in a situation, is of the “same nature” (behavioral dynamic) as how our parents treated each other, our siblings, relatives, and all other relationships they maintained and participated in, where only the roles they actively played changed.

The relationship between our parents (or guardians) that’s being openly demonstrated and modeled for us in the normal sense, becomes the same “relationship dynamic” we play out in some form or another in our adult romantic relationships. As a general rule, we typically become one of our parents and marry the other one. Whichever parent we identify with most and align with in terms of playing the same role, we play most often, yet we unconsciously play all roles in the dynamic as a general theme. For example, if one parent is always criticizing the other one, putting them down and sarcastically belittling them somehow, and the one being criticized responds with a particular behavior (lashing out, retaliating, equally belittling, being hurt, crying, outraged, angry, or running away, etc.), that same parent will have a tendency to treat the children the same way as a general rule, and they’ll respond in a like manner to how the other parent responded (according to what’s being modeled for them to imitate). Whatever we witness going on around us is being modeled for us, and as children we tend to learn by imitating whatever’s being demonstrated for us as a relationship and means of “appropriately” responding. The same “pattern” as an overall theme is being played out in a variety of ways with every relationship within the family, based on the theme both parents share in common and the behavioral dynamic that naturally issues forth from it.

        If we’re used to being criticized as children, we’re attracted to (naturally respond) and seek out relationships of various kinds where that same dynamic is shared and can be played out faithfully in a natural and automatic fashion. We initiate and provoke the pattern, regardless of what role we play just through the nature of our interaction. For this reason, because it’s unconscious, we often have no idea we’re doing it, and so we imagine we’re innocent and once again it’s being done to us, instead of realizing that we’re the perpetrator. If we’re used to being criticized, we have a tendency to also criticize others (though we may view it different), and naturally produce the behavior that warrants criticism. We can do this intentionally through a reaction to being criticized ourselves, or as a way of retaliating and getting even by switching roles. Even when we respond by turning inward, crying and becoming meek, we’re lashing out in our thoughts and criticizing or despising them to the same degree or more that we feel criticized. Yet often, when we’re doing the criticizing, we don’t see it that way, but rather as just giving them back their own medicine or giving them “constructive feedback”. We feel justified to respond in a like manner, usually without gaining any recognition whatsoever of the overall pattern that’s being played out at the unconscious level.

When something exists in us at the unconscious level, which all of our automatic, habitual behaviors do, they serve to form the very basis of our perception, our emotional states, and what memories we use to interpret things to give them meaning through the story we tell ourselves about it that describes, explains, or justifies it, forming how we experience it. Because they’re a normal and cohesive part of our perception and way of experiencing reality, we believe they’re real in the objective sense and we have no ability to change them, because we don’t realize that we’re actively participating in creating them. We don’t know how to see something different because we’ve perceived things that way our whole life and it comes natural to us. The experience is spontaneous and comes in a natural and automatic fashion without any awareness of choice or will being involved.

So the first challenge is to be able to become aware of our own tendencies by recognizing the behavioral dynamics as a theme that we’re playing a natural part in that’s of the same dynamic that we grew up with. This can often come with us realizing we’re having a tendency to say the same thing and act in the same manner as our parents did. By developing our ability to self-reflect and focus on our own feelings and motivation, instead of always focusing on the other person, while recognizing what memories are being triggered through association that are of the same nature, we can begin realizing what exists in us as a tendency that we’re either unaware of, or only partially aware of. We have a natural tendency to always focus on the “other person” by thinking almost exclusively about how they’re being and what they’re doing “to us”, then our whole approach becomes how to “change them” so they’ll stop doing it. Yet even if they were to stop doing it, we would act out in an unconscious fashion to provoke it in them as a way of keeping the pattern going because we don’t know how to play a part in another type of relationship.

       This is because we’re not only conditioned with one role or position in a pattern or idea, but with the “whole pattern” and behavioral dynamic of which we can play every role, whether through an aware state or an unaware one, because every role in that dynamic was constantly being modeled for us, and we were either the one doing it or watching it be done. Whatever role we identified most strongly with we continue playing out with awareness, and whichever one we didn’t, we continue playing out unconsciously. Because we build our identity out of the experiences this dynamic provides, we not only keep it going in an automatic fashion, but when we get into situations where it’s not being cooperatively played out, we don’t know how to act or what to do, and so we unconsciously initiate it and provoke the proper reaction in others that sets it into motion. Once it’s set into motion and begins playing out, we’re in our element, and we have an automatic “script” where we know exactly how to be, what to say, and what to do.

When we live our life out of perceptions of our conditioning, we live from a primarily unconscious state that simply acts to repeat patterns as themes (karma) in every area of our life, over and over. This habitual state of mind forms the “life dynamic” that produces the experiences that become our soul’s memory as our essence, character, and constitution. Our soul is developed through accumulated memory attained through the body and how it identifies with it. The more of a certain type of memory we accumulate, the stronger and more stable the pattern becomes, trapping the soul at an unconscious level where it often fails to realize it has the ability to become consciously aware of unconscious tendencies, and through that awareness, dissolve the pattern, freeing itself to create in new ways by making new decisions that produce brand new experiences.

       The soul not only possesses the higher capacity of consciousness necessary for self-creating, but it also exists in polarity to higher planes of consciousness, where it acts as a medium between the upper and lower regions, and serves as the passive aspect of the active higher will, which is capable of impregnating it just as it’s capable of impregnating the imagination of the subconscious mind with an idea that it turns into a material reality. Habitual patterns only continue to play out when we’re unaware of them. By utilizing the witnessing capacity of the soul to realize the unconscious patterns being played out, they no longer take place in an automatic fashion, because our very perception changes through the awareness, and if we begin engaging in the same tendencies, we catch ourselves and realize what we’re doing and why. We can learn how to realize our own part in things by dissociating from our experiences (not “in them” having them from an internal perspective) and viewing them instead from a detached and objective state. When we view our life from a second or third person perspective, we view the events from a distance (as another person would) and see ourselves not as the main character in our movie, but simply as one character in a greater story, and we can see ourselves in a different light as simply playing a role in acting out a common story.

Once we become aware and fully conscious in our life, no longer reactive and bound to habitual mindsets, we’re free of them and have the ability to make conscious decisions instead. Through our ability to choose who and how we’re going to be, what qualities we’re going to take on and express through, we begin creating ourselves in a more novel and unique manner. In this way we break free of the karma as unconscious states that dominate and bind us to a mindless process of creation, and we become fully empowered in our own life. The minute we decide to stop doing one thing as a natural response and role, we have to decide how we’re going to be and what we’re going to do instead. All habits are dissolved and transformed through awareness, choice, and replacing them with new patterns that create in a more intentional manner through a fully awake state.

Dr. Linda Gadbois

 

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